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Solaris Resources (TSX:SLS) Reports New Assay Results, Extends Warintza Central to 1,350 Strike Length

Solaris Resources (TSX:SLS) has reported new assay results from ongoing resource growth and discovery drilling at its flagship Warintza Project in Ecuador…

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This article was originally published by Mining Feed

Solaris Resources (TSX:SLS) has reported new assay results from ongoing resource growth and discovery drilling at its flagship Warintza Project in Ecuador this morning. Warintza has now been extended, and now overlaps the Warintza East discovery.

Vice President of Exploration for Solaris Resource commented in a press release: “We are very proud to continue the great work of the late David Lowell with our first two holes confirming Warintza East as the third major copper porphyry discovery within the 7km x 5km Warintza porphyry cluster. Our drilling fleet has now been fully reoriented to pursue an aggressive growth strategy via step-out and extensional drilling as we prepare to test our next targets for further discoveries.”

Highlights are listed below, with corresponding images in Figures 1-3 and detailed results in Tables 1-2. A dynamic 3D model is available on the Company’s website and will be updated to incorporate the most recent results.

Highlights

  • Eastern extension drilling has increased the strike length of Warintza Central to 1,350m where it now overlaps the western limits of Warintza East
  • SLS-33 was drilled from Warintza Central into a partially open volume to the north, returning 722m of 0.69% CuEq¹, including 426m of 0.85% CuEq¹ from 46m depth, infilling and extending mineralization to the north in this area
  • SLS-34 was collared at the northeastern limit of Warintza Central and drilled east into an entirely open volume, returning 660m of 0.47% CuEq¹, including 242m of 0.67% CuEq¹ from 52m depth, significantly extending mineralization to the east where it now partially overlaps Warintza East
  • SLSE-02, the second hole at Warintza East, was collared approximately 1,300m east of Warintza Central and drilled northwest toward SLS-34, returning 320m of 0.48% CuEq¹ from surface within a broader interval of 1,160m assaying 0.25% CuEq¹, partially overlapping SLS-34
  • SLSE-01 (previously reported September 27, 2021) was collared from the same platform as
    SLSE-02 but drilled to the southwest, returning 396m of 0.42% CuEq¹ from surface within a broader interval of 1,213m assaying 0.28% CuEq¹
  • Warintza East is the third major copper porphyry discovery within the Warintza cluster; each of the first two holes have returned long intervals of mineralization with the highest grades starting at or near surface reflecting the vertical zonation in the system

Figure 1 – Long Section of Warintza Central and Warintza East Drilling Looking Southeast

Figure 2 – Plan View of Warintza Drilling Released to Date

Figure 3 – Long Section of 3D Geophysics Looking Northeast

Note to Figure 3: Figure looks northeast and depicts high-conductivity geophysical anomaly (defined at 100 ohm-m) generated from 3D inversion of electromagnetic data, encompassing from left to right Warintza West, Central, East and the Yawi target (Warintza South lies off image to south).

Table 1 – Assay Results

Hole ID Date Reported From (m) To (m) Interval (m) Cu (%) Mo (%) Au (g/t) CuEq¹ (%)
SLS-34 Oct 25, 2021 52 712 660 0.36 0.02 0.06 0.47
Including 52 294 242 0.51 0.03 0.08 0.67
SLS-33 40 762 722 0.55 0.03 0.05 0.69
Including 46 472 426 0.71 0.03 0.06 0.85
SLSE-02 0 1160 1160 0.20 0.01 0.04 0.25
Including 0 320 320 0.39 0.02 0.04 0.48
SLS-32 Oct 12, 2021 0 618 618 0.38 0.02 0.05 0.48
SLS-31 8 1008 1000 0.68 0.02 0.07 0.81
SLS-30 2 374 372 0.57 0.06 0.06 0.82
SLSE-01 Sep 27, 2021 0 1213 1213 0.21 0.01 0.03 0.28
SLS-29 Sep 7, 2021 6 1190 1184 0.58 0.02 0.05 0.68
SLS-28 6 638 632 0.51 0.04 0.06 0.68
SLS-27 22 484 462 0.70 0.04 0.08 0.91
SLS-26 July 7, 2021 2 1002 1000 0.51 0.02 0.04 0.60
SLS-25 62 444 382 0.62 0.03 0.08 0.77
SLS-24 10 962 952 0.53 0.02 0.04 0.62
SLS-19 6 420 414 0.21 0.01 0.06 0.31
SLS-23 May 26, 2021 10 558 548 0.31 0.02 0.06 0.42
SLS-22 86 324 238 0.52 0.03 0.06 0.68
SLS-21 2 1031 1029 0.63 0.02 0.04 0.73
SLS-20 April 19, 2021 18 706 688 0.35 0.04 0.05 0.51
SLS-18 78 875 797 0.62 0.05 0.06 0.83
SLS-17 12 506 494 0.39 0.02 0.06 0.50
SLS-16 Mar 22, 2021 20 978 958 0.63 0.03 0.06 0.77
SLS-15 2 1231 1229 0.48 0.01 0.04 0.56
SLS-14 0 922 922 0.79 0.03 0.08 0.94
SLS-13 Feb 22, 2021 6 468 462 0.80 0.04 0.09 1.00
SLS-12 22 758 736 0.59 0.03 0.07 0.74
SLS-11 6 694 688 0.39 0.04 0.05 0.57
SLS-10 2 602 600 0.83 0.02 0.12 1.00
SLS-09 122 220 98 0.60 0.02 0.04 0.71
SLS-08 Jan 14, 2021 134 588 454 0.51 0.03 0.03 0.62
SLS-07 0 1067 1067 0.49 0.02 0.04 0.60
SLS-06 Nov 23, 2020 8 892 884 0.50 0.03 0.04 0.62
SLS-05 18 936 918 0.43 0.01 0.04 0.50
SLS-04 0 1004 1004 0.59 0.03 0.05 0.71
SLS-03 Sep 28, 2020 4 1014 1010 0.59 0.02 0.10 0.71
SLS-02 0 660 660 0.79 0.03 0.10 0.97
SLS-01 Aug 10, 2020 1 568 567 0.80 0.04 0.10 1.00
Notes to table: True widths cannot be determined at this time.

Table 2 – Collar Location

Hole ID Easting Northing Elevation (m) Depth (m) Azimuth (degrees) Dip (degrees)
SLS-34 800383 9648303 1412 1057 78 -60
SLS-33 799873 9648008 1632 764 0 -80
SLSE-02 801485 9648192 1170 1191 275 -50
Notes to table: The coordinates are in WGS84 17S Datum.

 

The above references an opinion and is for information purposes only. It is not intended to be investment advice. Seek a licensed professional for investment advice. The author is not an insider or shareholder of any of the companies mentioned above.

The post Solaris Resources (TSX:SLS) Reports New Assay Results, Extends Warintza Central to 1,350 Strike Length appeared first on MiningFeeds.




Author: Matthew Evanoff

Economics

Toward the Final Transition

A Book Review of Grand Transitions: How the Modern World Was Made, by Vaclav Smil.1

Over the last two decades, Vaclav Smil has produced a series of outstanding…

  • A Book Review of Grand Transitions: How the Modern World Was Made, by Vaclav Smil.1
Over the last two decades, Vaclav Smil has produced a series of outstanding scholarly works across a range of interconnected topics. The core interest in all cases is energy—its sources and uses—but this is embedded in a wider concern with natural resources of all kinds and the natural world and the impact of human activity on those. These, in turn, have led him to develop an interest in the nature of growth, technology, and innovation, natural and material limits, and the short- and medium-term prospects for humanity and modern civilization. He is often associated with the idea that he is particularly associated with is that of dematerialization—a change in patterns of production and consumption—and in the way these are organized—that reduces the physical impact of human beings upon the planet. His works are notable for their empiricism and foundation in factual evidence, rather than theory or fancy, and for a cautious and reserved approach to their subject—particularly when it comes to forecasts. He is very much a scientist, but his work can also be found located in the disciplines of sociology, politics and, above all, history. He has apparently remarked that he does not think he will ever own a mobile telephone—a point that is relevant to this review.

Smil’s most recent book, Grand Transitions, brings together his main concerns and interests. The subject of the book is the popular one of the nature of modernity and the modern world, the ways in which they differ from the greater part of the historic human past, and the process by which the old world of traditional society gave way to the one we now inhabit:, the modern. The work deftly combines two ways of addressing these:, by identifying and quantifying the novel or contrasting features of modernity as compared to the traditional, and by setting out and quantifying the processes that brought these into being. This also makes possible the subject matter of the final part of the book, which is an argument about what the future may hold. Revealingly, this last part is done more in terms of negatives—arguments about what will almost certainly NOT happen rather than extrapolations or forecasts of what WILL happen. The reason for this is the (correct) argument that we can be much more certain about what is impossible or highly unlikely than about what is possible. It would be easy for such an expansive survey to become ill-defined and sprawling but Smil avoids this with because of his clear conceptual framework and the argument that flows from it, something that draws upon his previous work.

“[Smil] takes the view that attempts to identify causes for observable major changes are almost always bound to fail because of methodological challenges but, above all, because of the central role of contingency and randomness in the historical human story.”

The key concept is that of a transition. This is not original to Smil, of course, but is widely employed in discussions of modernity. The way it works is to identify in a major area of human life—such as demography, politics, or economics—the dominant features of the traditional world that we can see persisting across the centuries and variations of geography and culture and compare and contrast them to the persistent and dominant features of the contemporary world. The next step is to identify and describe the way one changed into the other over the last two to three centuries (never more than that), and so to define the nature of the transition from the one to the other. What this makes possible is a quantitative approach that also examines qualitative questions. The issue that is not easily addressed—either in Smil’s work or others like it—is that of causation, of what it was that caused the transitions. Smil’s own approach is resolutely empirical, and he explicitly argues against the use of theoretical models (especially those involving advanced and complex mathematics) and elaborate abstract theory. He takes the view that attempts to identify causes for observable major changes are almost always bound to fail because of methodological challenges but, above all, because of the central role of contingency and randomness in the historical human story. The reason for this is the nature of complex systems (examples being with both human societies and natural ecosystems being examples of that) and the difficulty of directly linking outcomes to preceding states in such a system, along with the notorious problem of high dependence upon random initial conditions and strong path dependency. What one can do—and he does expertly—is to present a careful account of the shifts and processes, as accurately as possible given the limitations of evidence. This modest approach is refreshing and welcome when we contrast it to the elevated claims to insight and knowledge that we find elsewhere.

Smil identifies four key transitions—the ‘”grand transitions”’ of his title. These are: demographic, agriculture and diet, energy, and economic. For many, the most familiar for many is the demographic, the transition from a world of high birth rates and high mortality levels—particularly among children—to one of low birth rates (often below replacement level) and low death rates. The transition involves a time period when for some time the birth rate remains high while the death rate falls with a dramatic rise in population as a result until the birth rate declines. This transition has been completed in many parts of the world but is still in process in others. All the indications are that it will have happened everywhere by the middle part of this century. One aspect of this transition that is now becoming apparent is an ageing of the population, with an unprecedentedly high proportion of the population being elderly. The second—agriculture and diet—is marked by the movement from a world of subsistence where food production was often precarious, to one where a combination of economic integration and technological innovations (such as artificial fertilizers and pesticides) plus innovation in both varieties of crops and farming methods has produced a level of food supply that our ancestors would have seen as abundant. Smil emphasizes how this is not simply a matter of more food of the traditional kind being produced and consumed as there has also been a dramatic transition in diets with a move towards much greater variety and, generally, much higher intakes of fats and refined carbohydrates and meat (as opposed to grain products). This has pled to the novel situation of health problems caused by overeating rather than starvation and malnutrition.

The last two are separate in Smil’s account but reading the relevant chapters reveals that for him economic and energy transitions are so interconnected that it could make sense to see them as a single phenomenon. The economic one is the well-known path in which we have gone from a world where living standards were low for the overwhelming majority and very stable over the long term despite periodic fluctuations to one where they rise steadily. The energy transition is the movement from a world where the primary source of energy is human and animal muscle power—augmented where possible by wind and water—to one where these are enormously added to by energy derived from fossil fuels and, more recently, nuclear and renewable sources. The two transitions are connected because of the way that the great increase in productivity (and, hence, living standards) since the early nineteenth century is clearly in large part connected to the increasing employment of these new sources of energy—notably but not only in the form of electricity.

All this raises several questions. There are four transitions for Smil, but could we also argue that there are others? The obvious candidate is innovation with a transition from a world where innovation was rare, slow to be adopted and diffused, and systematically restrained and discouraged by both overt power and social institutions, to one where it is omnipresent, rapid, and generally lauded (at least officially). This clearly plays a part in all the other transitions. I suspect that the reason why Smil does not add this is because it is much more difficult to measure (given that, for various reasons, patents are for various reasons not a reliable measure and, in any case, only exist for the period since the other transitions were under way). Another question is this: the four transitions are clearly interconnected but might we argue that one is foundational and driving all the rest? The best candidate for that is the energy transition, but even there it is not clear how that can be seen to have caused the demographic one. Smil shows that the evidence does not support the common belief that it is the economic transition that drives the demographic one if anything the opposite is true. Alternatively, and more in line with Smil’s own approach, might we argue that the four transitions are so interdependent that none of them could take place singularly and that all four had to happen together or not at all?. This would emphasizse the degree to which we are dealing with a complex phenomenon that can be measured and described but which resists analysis, much less prediction.

That in turn brings us to the final part of Smil’s work, which summarizes much of his previous writings, and looks at where we are now and what is the likely future of these transitions is. One central point, —which is why he uses the term ‘”transitions”—is that, in his view, it is overwhelmingly unlikely that the processes that have produced these transitions will continue indefinitely or even for much longer. Instead of an open-ended process, what we will have is a movement from one stable state to another, a step change and hence a transition (as opposed to e.g. a ‘”take-off”’). The way this can be put mathematically is that we are not looking at exponential curves in the various indicators but logarithmic ones (S curves). The argument Smil makes—here and elsewhere—is that the transition is almost complete and that therefore we are therefore approaching the top of the logarithmic curve where it rapidly flattens out. For example, this implies for example that we are coming to the end of an era of economic growth and arriving at the steady state predicted by inter alia Adam Smith and John Stuart Mill. Another implication is that population growth will fall dramatically and be succeeded by decline until there is a new steady state, while yet another is that both the impact and rate of innovation will decline. If true, aAll of this has far-reaching implications if true. So much of our political thinking, for example—in all parts of the spectrum—is built around the presumption of continued growth that it will be a radical disruption if this does stop. It will make sense, in that case, to return to the thinking—and maybe even the practice—of thinkers from earlier periods who did not have that foundational presumption, or at least to update them.

One thing Smil argues very forcibly is that we will not see either a continued growth in energy usage or a major switch to renewable energy. He reiterates the argument he has made elsewhere that this is extremely unlikely because of the fundamental problem of energy density. The great advantage of fossil fuels is that they contain large quantities of energy in lightweight and compact form, so they have a high density, which in turn means they can do a lot of work. By contrast, renewable energy sources—particularly solar power and wind power—are diffuse, which means they have much less usable energy. They are fine for producing electricity (allowing for intermittency) but it is difficult to impossible to employ them for things such as transport, or industrial heating (including processes such as steel making and cement production). The problems with all the alternatives suggested are both technical and economic—there is the common problem of technologies that are technically feasible but hopelessly uneconomic. The consequence is that we can look forward to not only a stagnation of energy usage but a significant decline, due to the declining EROEI ratio of existing sources (EROEI = Energy Return Over Energy Invested, the ratio between the amount of energy gained and the energy that has to be expended used to get it). This has very obvious and extensive implications, which most people have not started to consider.

One point that Smil spends a lot of time exploring is the question of whether the final stage of the transitions will be a move to greater “‘dematerialization”’ brought about by the combination of greater wealth and increased difficulties with energy supply. The argument is that the pattern of the economic transition is for increasing productivity in which resources are used ever more intensively to produce ever larger amounts of physical output. As with all processes, this faces diminishing marginal returns and, eventually, what is increasingly produced are not physical products that require inputs of raw material and energy but immaterial ones where the only major input is time. These are not subject to the limits that restrict the continued growth in the production of physical products and services. All of this is very similar to the speculations of J. S. Mill in his consideration of the steady state towards the end of his Political Economy and again raises all kinds of fascinating questions as to the implications for our current economic, social, and political arrangements. Smil himself is too cautious and respectful of the limits of his evidence to come to a firm answer although he clearly thinks that this route of dematerialization of economic life is probable.

For more on these topics, see the EconTalk podcast episodes Andrew McAfee on More from Less and Matt Ridley on How Innovation Works. See also Economic Growth, by Paul Romer in the Concise Encyclopedia of Economics.

This book is a great starting point for anyone interested in exploring finding out about Smil’s work and thought for the first time—even though it is his latest work—because it is in some ways a summation of the main themes and arguments he has explored over the years. It is also a wonderful read for anyone interested in the question of what exactly the difference is between the traditional world and the modern world and how we got from one to the other, with a wealth of solidly grounded information—Smil’s work of synthesis saves much time in going to the original or, alternatively, points to where to go to look further. It is also a work of great interest for people interested in political thought, or philosophy, or cultural analysis inasmuch as it presents us with a clear challenge: if we are indeed coming to the close of a three- hundred- year period of transition from one steady state to another, how will that affect the way we live and order our affairs, and how must our thinking change?


Footnotes

[1] Vaclav Smil, Grand Transitions: How the Modern World Was Made. Oxford University Press, 2021.


*Dr. Stephen Davies is the Head of Education at the IEA. Previously he was program officer at the Institute for Humane Studies (IHS) at George Mason University in Virginia. He joined IHS from the UK where he was Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Economic History at Manchester Metropolitan University. He has also been a Visiting Scholar at the Social Philosophy and Policy Center at Bowling Green State University, Ohio. A historian, he graduated from St Andrews University in Scotland in 1976 and gained his PhD from the same institution in 1984. He has authored several books, including Empiricism and History (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003) and was co-editor with Nigel Ashford of The Dictionary of Conservative and Libertarian Thought (Routledge, 1991).


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Base Metals

Arizona Sonoran Copper extends mineralized area to the west of the Cactus pit

 
Arizona Sonoran Copper (ASCU.TO) has released the first few assay results from its diamond drill program on the flagship Cactus copper project in Arizona….

Arizona Sonoran Copper (ASCU.TO) has released the first few assay results from its diamond drill program on the flagship Cactus copper project in Arizona. The company released the results from eight holes which confirmed the presence of copper mineralization that could be recovered by using the heap leach process.

The program initially targeted to define additional copper-rich zones at depth under the western highwall of the existing pit and beneath the West Fault. A previous drill program in 2020 already confirmed the presence of additional mineralization towards the west of the known zones, and the current drill program was mainly designed to be an infill drill program to fill in the blanks between the 2020 results and the historical pit and known mineralization.

With good results like 40 meters of 0.519% soluble copper and 34 meters containing 0.77% soluble copper, the drill program appears to be successfully converting waste rock into a mineralized area that would meet the cut-off grade required to have an economical operation.

The exploration activities of Arizona Sonoran are off to a good start, but the Initial Public Offering of ASCU was rather weak as the company hasn’t traded a single second at its C$2.45 IPO price. And now, just a few weeks later, the share price is trading about 25% lower than the IPO level. Good for new entrants, but participants in the IPO will likely be disappointed.


Disclosure: The author has a long position in Arizona Sonoran. Please read our disclaimer.

Author: CR Team

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Articles

The Red-Hot Bull Market Investors Are Ignoring

We are right now in the early stages of a red-hot bull market for one often-overlooked natural resource.
It’s an essential commodity – one that is…

We are right now in the early stages of a red-hot bull market for one often-overlooked natural resource.

It’s an essential commodity – one that is currently worth about 100 times more than natural gas.

Soaring demand for this commodity – at a time when we’re facing a critical shortage – has created an explosive growth opportunity for those investors who know where to look.

This opportunity is in helium.

Yes…helium is now about 100 times more valuable than natural gas.

A resource that has for decades been thought of only as part of a child’s birthday balloon is actually one of the world’s most critical – and irreplaceable – commodities.

And right now we’re on the verge of a critical shortage.

Making matters worse is that, thanks to a combination of factors, there have been virtually no companies exploring for new sources of helium until very recently.

This opportunity is so potentially lucrative that an expert collaboration of natural resource veterans has come together to develop projects with extraordinary potential.

The company is Avanti Energy (TSX:AVN.V; OTCMKTS:ARGYF), a little-known Canadian company that now appears primed for rapid growth.

This Team Led Development on One of North America’s Largest Oil & Gas Discoveries…and Now They’re Seeking to Do It Again – With Helium

There’s a dire need for new, North American helium supplies to be brought online as quickly as possible.

For decades, the U.S. was the world’s largest producer of helium, accounting for as much as 40% of the worlds’ supply.

The world’s single largest source of helium for the past 70 years has been the U.S. Federal Helium Reserve (FHR) in Amarillo, Texas.

But within the past few years, the FHR stockpile has been depleted, and the helium market has opened up to the private sector for the very first time in modern history.

And with helium seeing such a tremendous surge in demand – thanks to its use in semiconductors as well as a host of other critical industries – a significant supply gap is emerging for this essential resource.

This is precisely the opportunity that helped bring together an All-Star collection of natural resource industry veterans with Avanti Energy (TSX:AVN.V; OTCMKTS:ARGYF).

It’s a team that was (while formerly at Encana) involved in the early stages of the discovery of the Montney Formation, one of the premier natural gas formations in North America.

Without question, the Avanti Energy team is the most experienced – and most decorated – in the helium space, with direct experience in developing multi-billion dollar projects from their time at Encana.

And that’s what this team is working to do again at Avanti Energy…with drilling set to commence on an initial three wells in what could ultimately prove to be a significant helium project in Montana.

Avanti CEO Chris Bakker has over two decades of experience in oil and gas, most recently working as a commercial negotiator with Encana (now Ovintiv) for major facilities and pipelines in the Montney gas play.

His expertise includes all facets of Natural Gas Exploration like land acquisition, exploration, drilling, well production and facility integration and construction.

Vice President of Subsurface Genga Nadaraju has over two decades of experience in the oil & gas industry…Director of Geoscience Dr. Jim Wood has over 30 years of experience as a geologist specializing in reservoir characterization…VP of Engineering Ali Esmail has spent the past 13 years specializing in reservoir engineering …and Senior Geophysicist Richard Balon has over 30 years of experience in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin.

This is an experienced team with an impressive track record of success in the oil and gas industry.

And now they appear poised to do it again.

Avanti Energy Could Be Sitting On As Much As $1 Billion Worth of Helium – or More – in the Greater Knappen Area

This very same successful team is now using the same methodology at Avanti Energy to explore for what it hopes will prove to be some of the richest helium deposits in the world.

The company’s strategy to date has been to pull in on only the very best properties in western Canada and the United States.

This search for “the best of the best” led Avanti Energy (TSX:AVN.V; OTCMKTS:ARGYF) to the Greater Knappen area of Alberta and Northern Montana.

The company has a 100% ownership stake in approximately 69,000 acres of helium prospective land in this mineral-rich region.

Just recently, the company announced that it had completed its geological interpretation of this property, discovering an estimated undiscovered and unrisked resource potential of:

* Low case: 1.4 bcf of Helium

* Mid case: 4.4 bcf of Helium

* High case: 8.9 bcf of Helium

Based on these estimates, it’s possible that Avanti Energy (TSX:AVN.V; OTCMKTS:ARGYF) could be sitting on as much as $1 billion worth of helium.

And they’re already moving forward with an aggressive schedule to bring production online as early as Q3 of 2022.

In fact, the first well in Montana is expected to be spud in early December with well results ready sometime early in the New Year.

And on November 9, the company announced that it has contracted with T&S Drilling for its initial three well drilling program at its Greater Knappen land holdings in Northern Montana.

The initial drilling program is scheduled to spud in early December and will target three separate pay zones, two in the Beaverhill Lake formation and one in the Basal Sandstone formation. The drilling targets exhibit structural highs with relief of 70m to >200m. Previously drilled wells surrounding Avanti’s lands have high helium shows in multiple Devonian and Cambrian targets with helium percentages of up to 2% and nitrogen percentages of up to 96%.

Analysts at Beacon Securities report that, “Our expectation of 3 exploratory wells in Q4/21 and initial helium production in Q3/22 remains unchanged…we continue to have high expectations for the Greater Knappen area. The initial drilling program in Montana and Alberta will just be the start of a multi-year exploration and development program for AVN. We maintain our $3.80 target price and our Spec Buy rating.”

This potential helium production – as early as Q3 2022 – is happening for Avanti Energy in the midst of soaring demand thanks to helium’s many impactful uses.

Why Helium is Seeing Such a “Rocket Launch” of Demand

As a noble gas helium is not combustible and has properties that make it irreplaceable for a number of important industrial applications.

Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe but it is extremely rare on earth.

With the global helium shortage we are now facing, it’s estimated that the supply will not keep up with demand for the next 20 years.

And that is happening as industry demand is projected to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 11% each year through 2037.

While helium is most commonly thought of as being used for the inflation of balloons, the truth is helium is used in a number of critical parts of daily life.

* Medical Industry – Helium is used to operate MRI machines and as part of respiratory treatments.

* Cryogenics – Helium is the only element that can come close to reaching absolute zero.

* Internet Connectivity – Fiber optic cables must be manufactured in a pure helium environment.

* Electronics – Many electronics and semiconductors – including mobile phones – require helium to be used at various stages of the production process.

* Computers – Helium-filled hard drives offer 50% higher storage capacity with 23% lower operating power.

* Car Air Bags – Helium is the gas of choice for effecting the near instantaneous deployment of air bags in cars.

Helium is used by companies like Amazon, Google and Netflix to help cool their data centers. And both the U.S. and Canadian governments have recently added helium to their critical minerals lists.

Not to mention… an estimated $12 million worth of helium is needed for a single space rocket launch.

In fact, the single largest buyer of helium is NASA, consuming almost 75 million cubic feet annually to cool liquid hydrogen and oxygen for rocket fuel.

And with the highly publicized rocket launches from Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin…that consumption of helium for space launches is only likely to increase in the months ahead.

That’s why Avanti Energy (TSX:AVN.V; OTCMKTS:ARGYF) right now appears to be such an attractive potential investment.

– The company is led by a team of oil and gas executives with a history of success in the exploration space, including the discovery of the Montney Formation, one of the premier natural gas formations in North America.

Avanti Energy’s shares are currently trading for less than $1.50 per share – meaning there is tremendous upside potential.

– Beacon Securities has established a price target of $3.80 for the stock – more than a 100% increase from its current level and maintains its Spec Buy rating on the company.

– In addition, Avanti Energy (TSX:AVN.V; OTCMKTS:ARGYF) Chris Bakker is so confident in the company’s potential that he spent nearly $500,000 buying stock at levels nearly double where the stock is now, with purchases at $2.91 per share on May 5, 2021 and at $2.45 per share in June. And with the recent drilling announcement, Bakker started buying again…

– The company has identified a significant potential helium resource on its Greater Knappen property and is moving quickly to commence drilling. With a target spud date in early December for the first well, the company is on target to begin initial production upon successful testing sometime in Q3 of 2022.

Other companies that could benefit from a different kind of shortage…

While the tech industry runs on helium…it is also dependent on another kind of resource. One that both a shortage of materials, and production shutdowns during COVID-19 has made increasingly scarce. Semiconductors.

One of the world’s leading semiconductor manufacturers, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (NYSE:TSM) has a storied history and helped shape many technologies we rely on today. Founded by Morris Chang in 1987 as part-time contract chipmaker for IBM and Motorola–the company that would eventually become known simply as “TSM ” or Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company was only 200 strong when it started out back then! It wasn’t until quality control became its top priority day 1 though; this focus makes all difference because even with more employees than any other foundry group at over 14k people now (with plenty still coming soon) they’re able to maintain those high standards which led them into becoming one of Apple Inc.’s primary suppliers alongside Nvidia Corp., Qualcomm, and more.

The global semiconductor industry is a highly competitive one and only five companies in the world own chip-making facilities, making Taiwan Semiconductor a standout in the industry.. Indeed, many leading top semiconductor companies are “fabless,” meaning they only design the chips but rely on other companies, known as foundries, to actually make the chips. The shift to outsourcing has been having a big effect on structural changes and related capacity because companies that cut orders in the early days of the pandemic have been forced to go to the back of the line.

Taiwan Semiconductor is a key player to watch in both the helium shortage and the semiconductor shortage. As the world’s largest chipmaker, it needs helium to survive. And with a semiconductor supply squeeze looming, it could stand to benefit big when Big Tech comes knocking.

Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is a multinational technology company headquartered in California. It has been around since the late 1950’s, when it was founded by Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore who first coined their portmanteau name- Integrated Electronics or Ie. Intel supplies processors for computer systems such as desktops laptop servers tablets mobile phones (including smartphones) and more; they also make motherboard chipsets that connect these devices together so you can use your processor effectively while having access to fast memory too!

At its core, Intel is a chipmaker. And a big one at that. It’s also a leader in the global semiconductor game thanks to its investments in 65nm process, an advanced node used in volume CMOS semiconductor fabrication. Intel has manufactured semiconductors in Ireland since 1990, and has invested around $6 billion there in this time, but is beginning to branch out with new investments in the United States, as well.

Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ:AMD) is an innovator in the world of computing and graphics. The company was founded over forty years ago with a single mission: to advance technology as fast it could be invented. Since then, they’ve become one of the most relied upon brands for processing power – both at home on your own PC or game console; but also when you need high performance computer systems that can process data quickly enough maybe even live video streaming where every millisecond counts!

Advanced Media Devices isn’t just building home computers, either. AMD also is building CPUs to be used in massive data centers, the kind supporting the likes of Microsoft’s Azure cloud-based workstations and desktops and much more. And its GPUs are providing the speed, security, and scalability to keep these data centers performing at the level needed to push modern tech into the future.

Nvidia (NASDAQ:NVDA), AMD’s biggest competitor, is a company that develops graphics processing units, or GPUs. Nvidia was founded in 1993 and has been making waves in the gaming industry ever since with their innovative products. They are continually releasing new technologies to stay ahead of the competition and have an excellent reputation for quality. The company also manufactures processors that power many other devices such as automobiles, robots, and smartphones. These processors are often used for artificial intelligence systems like driverless cars or voice commands on mobile phones so we can expect Nvidia’s technology to keep getting more advanced over time!

Nvidia’s dedication to innovation is clear in all areas of tech, from computer graphics and artificial intelligence research that are core to robots or future cities.

It’s also pushing new technologies into the world with its enterprise server GPUs—even setting records! Thanks for being there when we needed you most, Nvidia–and don’t worry: your hardware will not go unsupported now that it has been so instrumental before this point too.

With more and more demand coming for semiconductors and new chip technology hitting the market, companies like Nvidia, AMD, Taiwan, Samsung and Intel are going to be some of the biggest benefactors. They’re already well-known in the industry, and this could just be their time to really shine. But a looming helium shortage could present a number of complications for the booming tech giants.

IBM Corporation (NYSE:IBM) or International Business Machines Corporations an American multinational technology company with headquarters in Armonk New York. They specialize in developing and providing computer related products worldwide like the automated teller machine (ATM), magnetic stripe card which we use today for credit cards among other things such as floppy disks drives; hard disk drives that store data magnetically on aluminum foil within a circular shape called platters rotating at over 3 inches per second so it can be read by head movements inside our computers.

IBM is often considered one of the most innovative companies in its field, with a long list of inventions to date. In fact they were responsible for many technologies that are now taken-for granted and seen around us every day like ATMs or floppy disks! And while this history certainly makes them an excellent candidate when it comes time to explore new trends such as blockchain technology; their rapid growth means they aren’t ignoring any potential opportunities – which could very well turn out right where you least expect them first.

IBM’s blockchain platform, built on the open-source Hyperledger Fabric platform from the Linux Foundation is helping companies with a wide variety of blockchain solutions including tools for the finance sector, supply chain transparency, and letters of guarantee. IBM’s blockchain platform even helps interested parties develop their own blockchain solutions through educational tools and personalized assistance.

Lithium Americas Corp. (TSX:LAC) is one of America’s most critical and promising pure-play lithium companies. With two world-class lithium projects in Argentina and Nevada, Lithium Americas is well-positioned to ride the wave of growing lithium demand in the years to come. It’s already raised nearly a billion dollars in equity and debt, showing that investors have a ton of interest in the company’s ambitious plans.

Lithium America is not looking over the growing pressure from investors for responsible and sustainable mining, either. In fact, one of its primary goals is to create a positive impact on society and the environment through its projects. This includes cleaner mining tech, strong workplace safety practices, a range of opportunities for employees, and strong relationships with local governments to ensure that not only are its employees being taken care of but local communities, as well.

Celestica (TSX:CLS) is a key company in the resource boom due to is role as one of the top manufacturers of electronics in North America. Celestica’s wide range of products includes but is not limited to communications solutions, enterprise and cloud services, aerospace and defense products, renewable energy, and even healthcare tech.

Due to its exposure to the renewable energy market, Celestica’s future is tied hand-in-hand with the green energy boom that’s sweeping the world at the moment. It helps build smart and efficient products that integrate the latest in power generation, conversion and management technology to deliver smarter, more efficient grid and off-grid applications for the world’s leading energy equipment manufacturers and producers.

Turquoise Hill Resources Ltd. (TSX:TRQ) is a key player in Canada’s resource and mineral industry. It is a major producer of coal and zinc, two resources with distinctly different futures. While headlines are already touting the end of coal, zinc is a mineral that will play a key role in the future of energy for years and years to come.

In addition to its zinc operations, Turquoise Hill is also a significant producer of Uranium. Uranium is a key material in the production of nuclear energy, which many analysts are suggesting could be a major component in the global transition to cleaner energy. While the mineral has not seen significant price action in recent years, there are a number of new projects set to come online across the globe in the medium term, which could be a boon to Turquoise Hill, especially as alternative energies gain traction in the marketplace.

Teck Resources (TSX:TECK.A) could be one of the best-diversified miners out there, with a broad portfolio of Copper, Zinc, Energy, Gold, Silver and Molybdenum assets. It’s even involved in the oil scene! With its free cash flow and a lower volatility outlook for base metals in combination with a growing push for copper and zinc to create batteries, Teck could emerge as one of the year’s most exciting miners.

Though Teck has not quite returned to its January highs, it has seen a promising rebound since April lows. In addition to its positive trajectory, the company has seen a fair amount of insider buying, which tells shareholders that the management team is serious about continuing to add shareholder value. In addition to insider buying, Teck has been added to a number of hedge fund portfolios as well, suggesting that not only do insiders believe in the company, but also the smart money that’s really driving the markets.

Maxar Technologies (TSX:MAXR) is one of the leading space companies on the planet, founded nearly 20 years ago. Maxar has a variety of services, including satellite development, space robotics, and earth observations. One of their most well-known products is the Canadarm2 robotic arm for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has been operational since 1998 with more than 100 missions to date. Maxar Technologies has had a history of partnering with NASA to maintain the ISS’s systems as well as providing them with new technologies such as the Canadarm2 robotic arm. is a moon-bound tech stock to keep an eye on. While space firm specializes in satellite and communication technologies, it is also a manufacturer of infrastructure required for in-orbit satellite services, Earth observation and more.

More importantly, however, Maxar’s subsidiary, SSL, a designer and manufacturer of satellites used by government and commercial enterprises, has pioneered research in electric propulsion systems, lithium-ion power systems and the use of advanced composites on commercial satellites. These innovations are key because they allow satellites to spend more time in orbit, reducing costs and increasing efficiency.

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