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BTC, ETH, XRP, BNB, DOGE: Why Is Crypto Tanking Today?

Today appears to be turning into a bloodbath for various high-profile cryptocurrencies. Indeed, investors watching as crypto tanks today may be wondering…

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Today appears to be turning into a bloodbath for various high-profile cryptocurrencies. Indeed, investors watching as crypto tanks today may be wondering what the root cause of this price action is.

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After all, many expected today to be a relatively strong one in the crypto world. Today marks the first day Bitcoin (CCC:BTC-USD) will be accepted as legal tender by a sovereign nation. El Salvador has become the first country to fully integrate a cryptocurrency into the country’s official monetary system.

However, Bitcoin, as well as its mega-cap peers Ethereum (CCC:ETH-USD), Ripple (CCC:XRP-USD), Binance Coin (CCC:BNB-USD) and Dogecoin (CCC:DOGE-USD), are all down dramatically today. Over the past 24 hours, each of these tokens is down between 10% and 17% at the time of writing.

This price action may certainly be a head-scratcher for many crypto enthusiasts. After all, these high-profile cryptocurrencies have been on quite the run in recent weeks. Accordingly, questions of whether today is just a healthy correction from recent highs, or the start of another major decline, are permeating today.

Let’s dive into two key drivers of this price action today.

Why Is Crypto Tanking Today?

The first key driver of today’s decline appears to be the El Salvadorian move toward adopting Bitcoin as legal tender. What was supposed to be a catalyst appears to be driving uncertainty in crypto markets today.

Why?

Well, the government’s pre-loaded Bitcoin wallet with $30 for every El Salvadorian citizen, Chivo, hasn’t gotten off to a great start. The government was forced to disconnect this wallet earlier today due to technical issues. Various tests are being run, and the government is looking to get this program started as soon as possible.

However, this certainly isn’t a good first impression. Users in El Salvador who already may have been skeptical about Bitcoin may be less likely to use this wallet. Accordingly, investors bullish on Bitcoin’s ability to truly replace fiat money will have to wait to see how this plays out.

Additionally, various market pundits are calling today’s price action in the crypto world a “flash crash.” Accordingly, concerns around how protracted this crash may be are circulating. Most crypto enthusiasts expect this flash crash scenario to be corrected in short order. However, time will ultimately tell where crypto valuations go from here.

On the date of publication, Chris MacDonald did not have (either directly or indirectly) any positions in the securities mentioned in this article. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the writer, subject to the InvestorPlace.com Publishing Guidelines.

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Economics

Pros Increased ‘Crash’ Protection As Reflexive Vol-Sellers Rescued Stocks Yesterday

Pros Increased ‘Crash’ Protection As Reflexive Vol-Sellers Rescued Stocks Yesterday

A dramatic rebound in stocks – off the S&P’s 100DMA…

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Pros Increased 'Crash' Protection As Reflexive Vol-Sellers Rescued Stocks Yesterday

A dramatic rebound in stocks - off the S&P's 100DMA - has prompted many commission-rakers and asset-gatherers today to call the end of the Evergrande event and signal the all-clear to new highs.

So what happened? What changed?

Nomura's Charlie McElligott explains that there is simply no way to overstate the power of the “reflexive vol sellers” into another spike, as this “sell the rip (in vol)” = “buy the dip (in stocks),” particularly as it related Put sellers either directionally shorting “rich” vols yday…and “long sellers” who monetized their downside hedges by the close (a lot of that being 1d SPY Puts from Retail “day traders” which doesn’t show in OI), creating $Delta to buy and again self-fulfilling yet another “turnaround Tuesday”

Critically, that Delta buying in the late day was hugely important then in reducing the absolute $ of systematic deleveraging “accelerant” flows, because only closing down -170bps in SPX then meant a much more manageable -$24.7B of Vol Control de-allocation in coming days, as opposed to what would have been a much more challenging -$62.9B to digest which we estimate would have been triggered off of a “-3% close”…while similarly, Leveraged ETFs only needed to rebalance -$5.9B at EOD, as opposed to a hypothetical -$8.9B assumed at the low of the day

Specifically, as SpotGamma details, the chart below shows that puts were net closed at all strikes above 4365 SPX (and 435 SPY) but there were fairly substantial positions added to lower strikes.

This indicates puts were rolled rather than outright closed. Again, with the Fed tomorrow trades want to leave some protection on.

Put volume surged relative to calls yesterday...

To Nomura's Charlie McElligott's amazement yesterday, we saw confirmation of our repeated point made stating that “the only things that clears out all that “crash” pricing in vol metrics is a crash”... yet it is VERY worth noting then that we actually saw Skew still steepen further yday despite incredibly high levels of both ATM Vol and Skew (SPX 1m 25delta Put Call Skew steepened 70bps, same gig for others: QQQ 64bps, IWM 37bps)...

...which tells us that the Dealer “short Vol / short Skew” problem still remains lurking in background.

SpotGamma concludes that its up to Powell tomorrow to set the next price move, which should be rather substantial due to the options positioning. Negative gamma could strongly influence any selling to the downside.

To the upside there is also a ton of fuel for an vanna-induced move if traders sell off their puts and crush the high implied volatility levels. Therefore while today is likely about chop, the move out of Wednesday should be substantial.

Tyler Durden Tue, 09/21/2021 - 09:49
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Economics

TSX down in every sector amid Canada election & Evergrande crisis

The substantial bankruptcy by Chinese property developer Evergrande triggered an economic slowdown on Monday September 20 across the globe which is…

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The substantial bankruptcy by Chinese property developer Evergrande triggered an economic slowdown on Monday, September 20, across the globe, which is impacting the financial systems. Additionally, the upcoming Fed’s action for pumping stimulus into the economy seemingly created uncertainty among the investors.

All the 11 major sectors registered on the TSX composite were down including healthcare (5.01%), Energy (2.84%), Industrial (1.78%), Financial (1.75%) and Technology (1.51%). Thus, the TSX composite index continued in the red zone after losing 335.82 points or down by 1.63% settled at 20,154.54.

The one-year price chart (as on September 20, 2021). 

Active volume

TC Energy Corporation was the most actively traded stock where 17.80 million exchanged hands, followed by Canadian Natural Resources where 15.02 million exchanged hands, and Suncor Energy Inc. with 8.64 million shares exchanging hands.

Movers and laggards

Wall Street update

Concerns over the probable collapse of China's real estate company Evergrande weighed heavily on US equities on Monday, with the main averages all suffering their biggest losses in many weeks.

Traders were also looking forward to the Federal Reserve's monetary policy statement on Wednesday. The central bank is largely anticipated to maintain its current monetary policy, but it may discuss the future of its asset purchase program.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished the afternoon down 614.41 points or 1.78% at 33,970.47. The S&P 500 fell by 75.26 points or 1.7% to 4,357.73, while the Nasdaq was down by 330.06 points or 2.19% to 14,713.80.

Commodity update

Gold traded at US$ 1,763.80, up 0.54%.

Brent oil slipped down at US$ 73.92/bbl down 1.48%, while Crude oil also traded at US$ 70.29/bbl down by 1.72%.

Currency news

The Canadian Dollar slid against the U.S. Dollar on Monday, while USD/CAD closed at 1.2825, climbing 0.46%.

The U.S. Dollar index gained marginally against the basket of major currencies on September 20, and ended at 93.23, up 0.01%.

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Economics

Transitory-Ness In The TIPS Market

With all the debate about the persistence of inflation, one natural thing to ask is: what is the market pricing? Unfortunately for those who are selling a “return to the 1970s” narrative, “Mr. Market” is firmly in the camp of “Team Transitory.” Of cour…

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With all the debate about the persistence of inflation, one natural thing to ask is: what is the market pricing? Unfortunately for those who are selling a “return to the 1970s” narrative, “Mr. Market” is firmly in the camp of “Team Transitory.” Of course, one imagines that the immediate response is that the “markets are wrong.” Since many of the people in the “inflation is coming!” crowd are also in the “markets are always right” camp, there is a good chance they might modify the argument to “markets are wrong according to some affine term structure model.”

(Note: The server issues that stopped me from posting this yesterday are obviously sorted.)

The baseline for our discussion is the most straightforward measure of “forward inflation expectations” is the figure above: the 5-year TIPS inflation breakeven rate, starting 5 years forward. I took the series directly as calculated by the St. Louis Federal Reserve as based on the Fed H.15 fitted Treasury rates, but they used the exact same approximation I would use in this circumstance.

To give a quick primer for those new to the topic, the “breakeven inflation rate” on an inflation-indexed bond (in this case, U.S. TIPS) is that future rate of inflation that gives the same total return as nominal government bonds (conventional Treasuries). That is, it is literally the rate of inflation where the two types of government bonds have the same return (break even). From the perspective of mathematical finance — as used in option pricing — this is where the expected inflation rate is, using the mathematical definition of expectation. One should keep this notion of “expectation” distinct from the notion of “forecast,” as I discuss below.

I showed the forward rate instead of the spot rate (a breakeven over the time period starting now) so that we can see what is priced in after current disturbances have subsided. (I did not even bother looking at spot breakeven inflation rates.)

As the chart above shows, the forward breakeven has recovered from the usual collapse we see in financial panics during the lockdown period, but are still well below where it was last cycle. (Which was too high in retrospect.).

(My book Breakeven Inflation Analysis offers more information on this topic.)

I would argue that the only sensible takeaway from that figure is that inflation market participants are not deeply concerned about a secular rise in inflation. Beyond that, I do not have enough information to be more specific. My immediate concern is that the above time series is an approximation, and we really would need to dig in the details of bond-specific pricing to have more confidence in the exact level of forwards.

The reality is that TIPS market is not incredibly liquid, and there are fewer issues to work with. Meanwhile, an individual issue can have pricing quirks like seasonal effects based on its coupon dates. The figure above certainly gives the correct big picture, but one should not view the specific levels as being definitive at any point in time. Even without access to the instrument-specific data, I believe that it is fair to assume that error bars are currently larger than usual.

(The inflation swap market can give a cleaner read on forwards, but I am out of the loop with regards to the liquidity in that market currently. Inflation swaps always tend to be secondary to government bond inflation markets, since it is extremely hard to find anyone other than the central government willing to sell inflation protection in size.)

The reason why academics or central bankers will say the above reading is incorrect is because they have models that allege that the risk premia have been zooming around, and so the “real expectations” are way higher than observed breakevens. That is, the breakeven might be the mathematical expectation, but forecasts (“expectations” in common English) are higher.

One of the interesting things about fixed income is that outsiders insist that bond market participants routinely misprice bonds while within the bond market there are entire teams whose entire day job is to price bonds correctly. (I used to lead one of such teams.) Whatever.

The problem with the “risk premia zooming around” story is that it is unclear that any of the models offer useful information. They are internally consistent, yes. But do they offer useful information — where we measure “usefulness” by generating profitable trade analysis? In general, they do not pass that test. For example, it is entirely typical for the models to suggest that term premia in a certain part of the curve was heavily negative — and then the realised excess returns were quite positive, as any ignorant shnook fixed income quant could have told the academics.

In this case, I have some sympathies for a demand for inflation protection forcing breakevens lower. But there is no way to get from there to a “1970s is coming!” narrative. At best, we are “really” just back where expectations were last cycle.


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(c) Brian Romanchuk 2021
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