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Dear Bureau Of Labor Statistics, Explain This ‘Inflation’ Anomaly…

Dear Bureau Of Labor Statistics, Explain This ‘Inflation’ Anomaly…

Having slowed for two straight months, whisper numbers predicted a slightly…

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This article was originally published by Zero Hedge

Dear Bureau Of Labor Statistics, Explain This ‘Inflation’ Anomaly…

Having slowed for two straight months, whisper numbers predicted a slightly hotter than expected September CPI (edging up to 5.4% YoY, slightly above the consensus of 5.3%) on the back of a re-intensification of supply-chain bottlenecks due to a combination of natural disasters and COVID disruptions in the US and Asia kept pressure on manufactured goods in September.

Headline CPI did indeed come hotter than expected  (+0.4% MoM vs +0.3% exp) with the YoY spike edging back up to +5.4%…That is equal to its highest since July 2008.

Source: Bloomberg

Services prices rebounded while goods costs slowed their YoU growth very modestly (but remains at highest since 1981)…

Source: Bloomberg

Fuel Oil and Gas Utility prices dominated the MoM gains with Used Car prices actually dropping modestly (which is odd given that Manheim used car prices are at record highs)…

Dear Bureau of Labor Statistics, explain this!!

Let us guess – hedonics? Or we would need a PhD to really understand?

Core CPI’s recent slowing picked up in September with a 0.2% MoM jump (vs +0.1% exp) leaving YoY flat around +4.0%.

Source: Bloomberg

Housing inflation is really ramping up with the shelter index increased over the month, rising 0.4 percent. The index for rent rose 0.5 percent in September, while the index for owners’ equivalent rent rose 0.4 percent over the month.

  • Shelter inflation jumped 3.14% Y/Y vs 2.84% in August, highest since Feb 2020

  • Rent inflation was up to 2.43% from 2.12% in August, highest since Nov 2020

Oh, and Dear Bureau of Labor Statistics, explain this one too!!

Real-time data from places like apartment list suggests OER should be 6% now…

Finally, we note that the index for airline fares continued to fall sharply, decreasing 6.4 percent over the month after falling 9.1 percent in August.

But, but, but… the recovery? And Vaccines?

Tyler Durden
Wed, 10/13/2021 – 08:38

Author: Tyler Durden

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Economics

Von Greyerz: Shortages & Hyperinflation Lead To Total Misery

Von Greyerz: Shortages & Hyperinflation Lead To Total Misery

Authored by Egon von Greyerz via GoldSwitzerland.com,

At the end of major…

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Von Greyerz: Shortages & Hyperinflation Lead To Total Misery

Authored by Egon von Greyerz via GoldSwitzerland.com,

At the end of major economic cycles, shortages develop in all areas of the economy. And this is what the world is experiencing today on a global basis. There is a general lack of labour, whether it is restaurant staff, truck drivers or medical personnel.

There are also shortages of raw materials, lithium (electric car batteries), semi-conductors, food,  a great deal of consumer products, cardboard boxes, energy and etc, etc. The list is endless.

SHORTAGES EVERYWHERE

Everything is of course blamed on Covid but most of these shortages are due to structural problems. We have today a global system which cannot cope with the tiniest imbalances in the supply chain.

Just one small component missing could change history as the nursery rhyme below explains:

For want of a nail, the shoe was lost.
For want of a shoe, the horse was lost.
For want of a horse, the rider was lost.
For want of a rider, the battle was lost.
For want of a battle, the kingdom was lost.
And all for the want of a 
horseshoe nail
.

The world is not just vulnerable to shortages of goods and services.

BOMBSHELLS

Bombshells could appear from anywhere. Let’s just list a few like:

  • Dollar collapse (and other currencies)

  • Stock market crash

  • Debt defaults, bond collapse (e.g. Evergrande)

  • Liquidity crisis  (if  money printing stops or has no effect)

  • Inflation leading to hyperinflation

There is a high likelihood that not just one of the above will happen in the next few years but all of them.

Because this is how empires and economic bubbles end.

The Roman Empire needed 500,000 troops to control its vast empire.

Emperor Septimius Severus (200 AD) advised his sons to “Enrich the troops with gold but no one else”.

As costs and taxes soared,  Rome resorted to the same trick that every single government resorts to when they overextend and money runs out – Currency Debasement.

So between 180 and 280 AD the Roman coin, the Denarius, went form 100% silver content to ZERO.

And in those days, the soldiers were shrewd and demanded payment in gold coins and not debased silver coins.

Although the US is not officially in military conflict with any country, there are still 173,000 US troops in 159 countries with 750 bases in 80 countries. The US spends 11% of the budget or $730 billion on military costs.

Since the start of the US involvement in Afghanistan, Pentagon has spent a total of $14 trillion, 35-50% of which going to defence contractors.

Throughout history, wars have mostly started out as profitable ventures, “stealing” natural resources (like gold or grains) and other goods–often due to shortages. But the Afghan war can hardly be regarded as economically successful and the US would have needed a more profitable venture than the Afghan war to balance its budget.

US HOPELESSLY BANKRUPT  – NEEDS TO BORROW 46% OF BUDGET

The US annual Federal Spending is $7 trillion and the revenues are $3.8 trillion.

So the US spends $3.2 trillion more every year than it earns in tax revenues. Thus, in order to “balance” the budget, the declining US empire must borrow or print 46% of its total spending.

Not even the Roman Empire, with its military might, would have got away with borrowing or printing half of its expenditure.

TOTAL MISERY AS MR MICAWBER SAID:

As Mr Micawber in Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield said:

‘Annual income 20 pounds, annual expenditure 19 [pounds] 19 [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness. Annual income 20 pounds, annual expenditure 20 pounds ought and six, result misery.’

And when, like in the case of the US, you spend almost twice as much as you earn that is TOTAL MISERY.

Neither an individual, nor a country can spend 100% more than their earnings without serious consequences. I have written many articles about these consequences and how to survive the Everything Bubble

INFLATION IS HERE

The most obvious course of events is continuous shortages combined with prices of goods and services going up rapidly. I remember it well in the 1970s how for example oil prices trebled between 1974 and 1975 from $3 to $10 and by 1980 had gone up 10x to $40.

The same is happening now all over the world.

That puts Central banks between a Rock and a Hard place as inflation is coming from all parts of the economy and is NOT TRANSITORY!

Real inflation is today 13.5% as the chart below shows, based on how inflation was calculated in the 1980s

IMPLOSION OR EXPLOSION

The central bankers can either squash the chronic inflation by tapering and at the same time create a liquidity squeeze that will totally kill an economy in constant need of stimulus. Or they can continue to print unlimited amounts of worthless fiat money whether it is paper or digital dollars.

If central banks starve the economy of liquidity or flood it, the result will be disastrous. Whether the financial system dies from an implosion or an explosion is really irrelevant. Both will lead to total misery.

Their choice is obvious since they would never dare to starve an economy craving for poisonous potions of stimulus.

History tells us that central banks will do the only thing they know in these circumstances which is to push the inflation accelerator pedal to the bottom.

Based of the Austrian economics definition, we have had chronic inflation for years as increases in money supply is what creates inflation. Still, it has not been the normal consumer inflation but asset inflation which has benefitted a small elite greatly and starved the masses of an increase standard of living.

As the elite amassed incredible wealth, the masses just had more debts.

So what we are now seeing is the beginning of a chronic consumer inflation that most of the world hasn’t experienced  for decades.

THE INEVITABLE CONSEQUENCES OF CURRENCY DESTRUCTION

This is the inevitable consequence of the destruction of money through unlimited printing until it reaches its the intrinsic value of Zero. Since the dollar has already lost 98% of its purchasing power since 1971, there is a mere 2% fall before it reaches zero. But we must remember that the fall will be 100% from the current level.

As the value of money is likely to be destroyed in the next 5-10 years, wealth preservation is critical.  For individuals who want to protect themselves from total loss as fiat money dies, one or several gold coins are needed.

So back to the nursery rhyme:

For want of a nail gold coin, the shoe was lost.
For want of a shoe, the horse was lost.
For want of a horse, the rider was lost.
For want of a rider, the battle was lost.
For want of a battle, the kingdom was lost.
And all for the want of a horseshoe nail gold coin.

Gold is not the only solution to the coming problems in the world economy. Still, it will protect you from the coming economic crisis like it has done every time in history

And remember that if you don’t hold properly stored gold you don’t understand:

  • What happens when bubbles burst

  • You are living in a fake world with fake money and fake valuations

  • Your fake money will be revalued to its intrinsic value of ZERO

  • Assets that were bought with this fake money will lose over 90% of their value

  • Stocks will go down by over 90% in real terms

  • Bonds will go down by 90% to 100% as borrowers default

  • You lack regard for your stakeholders whether they are family or investors

  • You don’t understand history

  • You don’t understand risk

The 1980  gold price high of $850 would today be $21,900,  adjusted for real inflation

So gold at $1,800 today is grossly undervalued and unloved and likely to soon reflect the true value of the dollar.

Tyler Durden
Sat, 10/23/2021 – 14:30











Author: Tyler Durden

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Economics

Biden Suffers Worst Approval Ratings Plunge Of Any President Since World War II 

Biden Suffers Worst Approval Ratings Plunge Of Any President Since World War II 

President Biden’s job approval rating has fallen the most…

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Biden Suffers Worst Approval Ratings Plunge Of Any President Since World War II 

President Biden’s job approval rating has fallen the most since the start of his term than any other president since World War II. 

A new Gallup poll was released Friday, polling Americans between Oct. 1-19 shows Biden’s approval rating plunged from 56% in Q1 to 44.7% in Q3, a whopping 11.3 percentage points that any president hasn’t seen in over 75 years. 

“Biden began his term with relatively solid approval ratings, ranging between 54% and 57% from January through June. His approval dropped to 50% in July and 49% in August as coronavirus infections surged in the U.S. The chaotic U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in late August, which included the deaths of more than a dozen U.S. military personnel in a terrorist attack at the Kabul airport, was likely the reason Biden’s September job approval rating fell further to 43%,” Gallup said. 

We noted in June that Gallup data showed Biden’s “honeymoon period” was over and said if the president cannot “tame inflation” could result in further rating declines. And, oh boy, were we right…

Biden also faces an increasing disillusionment among Americans that he can’t fix the border crisis, snarled supply chains, high gas prices, soaring inflation, consumer goods shortages, and the coronavirus pandemic, among a whole list of other things. 

His ratings suggest no improvement in Democrat support, declining support among Independents, and only 4% of Republicans polled approve of the job he’s done – that figure is likely to go to zero if things don’t turn around for the president. 

The 88% partisan gap in job approval is extraordinarily high considering Biden campaigned on “unity.” During his inauguration, he said: 

“We can join forces, stop the shouting and lower the temperature. For without unity there is no peace, only bitterness and fury. No progress, only exhausting outrage. No nation, only a state of chaos. This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge, and unity is the path forward.”

While Democrats are desperately trying to salvage their $3.5 trillion Build Back Better infrastructure plan, Americans are increasingly becoming confused about what exactly that means and how that will affect them. Repbulicans have requested the president to fix broken supply chain before more social spending. 

Souring support suggests Democrats could be on track to lose big in next year’s midterms. 

Tyler Durden
Sat, 10/23/2021 – 14:00

Author: Tyler Durden

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Economics

Week Ahead – Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Inflation is a growing concern For years central banks have been operating under the assumption that inflation will eventually return to target while having…

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Inflation is a growing concern

For years central banks have been operating under the assumption that inflation will eventually return to target while having the flexibility to wait until the economy is fully ready for higher rates. That luxury is a thing of the past and many now feel stuck between a rock and a hard place.

Most are hoping that a modest tightening of monetary policy will begin the address the problem and buy them enough time for inflation to show itself to be as transitory as they believe. Some are taking more drastic action with larger rate hikes to quickly bring inflation under control. And then there’s the CBRT.

Next week it’s the ECB’s turn to shed some light on how it will deal with inflation which is running well above target, an unusual problem for the central bank after a decade in which the threat of deflation has been a much greater risk.

Earnings season keeps investors positive

ECB prepares for the end of PEPP

Lira slides as CBRT loses credibility


Country

US

The calm before the November 3rd Fed storm should have investors focus on the advance reading of third-quarter GDP, mega-cap tech earnings, and the final version of President Biden’s economic package.  The economy was dealt a blow from the delta variant but most of the lost growth appears to be pushed back to next year.  On Thursday, analysts expect the economy in the third quarter to slow from 6.7% to 3.0%, which is a reflection of current supply chain issues and not falling demand. 

Risk appetite has remained intact as Wall Street continues to overlook supply chain issues, surging commodity prices, and rising transportation costs, but that could change if inflationary pressures intensify.  The next round of mega-cap tech earnings from Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, and Facebook could change Wall Street’s expectation on how much pricing pressures are persisting. 

Optimism is growing that after some large concessions, Democrats will get Senators Manchin and Sinema on board with President Biden’s economic package.  The US economic outlook next year is still looking bright as pent up demand and more stimulus will spur growth.  

EU 

The ECB meeting next week is the obvious standout event as markets look for clues on how the PEPP program will be replaced when it expires in March and whether it will be tempted to follow other central banks in tightening monetary policy. Headline inflation may be above target but there appears to be a firmer belief than elsewhere that this is temporary and they’ll be back below before long. With that in mind, investors will be keen to know whether other stimulus measures will be introduced in March. They may have to wait until December though when new economic projections will be prepared.

UK

UK businesses and households are facing a squeeze over the next year from higher energy prices, taxes, prices and interest rates as the BoE prepares to raise interest rates to counter high supply-side driven inflation. 

That makes the Chancellors Autumn budget on Wednesday all the more important. While the governments focus in the coming years will have to be on paying for the pandemic, they won’t want to act too fast and turn an already sluggish recovery into something worse. 

Russia

The ruble rallied strongly after the Bank of Russia raised interest rates by 0.75% on Friday, surpassing expectations of a 0.25% or 0.5% hike. Clearly, unlike their Turkish counterparts, the CBR is taking the threat of inflation serious and is prepared to raise them further as it raised its inflation forecast at the end of the year to 7.4-7.9%, almost double its 4% target.

The announcement saw the dollar fall briefly back below 70 against the ruble for the first time since June last year. Higher rates and soaring energy prices have supported the currency in recent months and with more hikes and a possible winter crisis in the pipeline, it could remain in favour for some time.

The unemployment rate on Friday is the only notable release.

South Africa

PPI and trade balance releases are the only releases of note next week.

Turkey

The lira fell more than 3% to a record low on Thursday and has continued to slide on Friday after the CBRT cut rates by 2%, at least twice as much as markets expected. The move ends the debate, if there was one, that the central bank is being influenced by President Erdogan, whose long-held views that high-interest rates spur inflation are well known.

The central banks’ credibility under Şahap Kavcıoğlu is ruined and its only hope of avoiding further troubles down the road is inflation falling significantly and very soon. Even then, central bank credibility is important, as is the divide between politics and monetary policy and they are both irreversibly damaged under Kavcıoğlu. The lira could remain under severe pressure for some time.

China

Evergrande has paid an offshore bond coupon today, one day before the grace period expiry. That has removed the immediate financial contagion threat from Mainland markets and reduced weekend risk. It faces another coupon payment deadline on the 29th though and this story is probably not going away soon.

China has no significant data this coming week, but with the central committee meeting due on the 8th of November, authorities will be doing their utmost to ensure that markets remain “serene” until then.  

PBOC officials have expressed comfort that the Yuan is fairly priced at these levels, so strength may continue. With China needing to source energy stocks “at any cost” a strong Yuan is probably their favoured position.

India

The Indian rupee recovery continues, but the story is more a weak US dollar one than a strong rupee one. A strong US earnings season is causing dollar weakness and this story means the rupee rally may have more life in it. 

India is entering the holiday season over the next two weeks and market volumes are likely to decrease, potentially amplifying short-term moves. No significant data releases this week. 

Australia & New Zealand

The Aussie and New Zealand dollars rallied strongly as global risk sentiment improved thanks to a strong US earnings season so far. Melbourne and Sydney’s reopening will also lift sentiment and the huge New Zealand inflation number leaves the RBNZ 0.50% hike trade, pencilled in for next month, in full swing. Going forward both will continue to be buffeted by swinging sentiment shifts in overseas markets. 

Australia has inflation data this Monday and PPI and Retail Sales on Friday. The RBA had to intervene in the 3-year bond market to cap rate hikes as markets locally started pricing in a change in RBA guidance from ultra-dovish. 

New Zealand markets continue ignoring rising delta cases and are myopically focused on pricing in a large RBNZ hike next month. Although the trade is now crowded, kiwi outperformance will continue as long as global risk sentiment remains positive.

Japan

The Bank of Japan announces its latest policy decision next week on Thursday. However, there is little chance of any change before November’s FOMC and ahead of the Lower House election on October 31st. Electioneering will dominate the headlines in Japan next week, but despite the noise, the Nikkei is following the Nasdaq closely. It would take a huge shift in polling away from the ruling LDP to shift the narrative negatively into domestic markets. 

USD/JPY remains near 114.00 and continues to be a purely US/Japan rate differential play. With rates firming in the US, and Japan low forever, USD/JPY’s path of least resistance continues to be higher. 


Key Economic Events

Sunday, Oct. 24

Events

By-elections will be held for upper house seats in Japan’s Shizuoka and Yamaguchi prefectures

Bank of England policymaker Mann speaks at the 3rd Bund Summit, China Finance Forum 40 on a panel about “Asset prices, inflation expectation and exit from economic stimulus.”

Monday, Oct. 25

Economic Data/Events

The ASEAN Business and Investment Summit speakers include US President Biden and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.

EU energy ministers hold an extraordinary council in Luxembourg to discuss rising energy prices in the bloc.

Germany IFO business climate

Mexico Unemployment

Singapore CPI

Japan leading index

Switzerland domestic sight deposits

Turkey real sector confidence

BOE policymaker Tenreyro speaks at an event hosted by CEPR and the central bank.

Tuesday, Oct. 26

Economic Data/Events

FDA advisory panel meeting may decide on whether children ages 5 to 11 could get a COVID vaccine

Bank of France Governor Villeroy de Galhau speaks at a sustainable finance event in Paris.

Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau may announce the new cabinet

Australia ANZ consumer confidence

China Bloomberg economic survey

Hong Kong trade

PPI: Spain, Sweden, Japan

South Korea GDP

Mexico international reserves

Japan bond purchases

Singapore industrial production

U.S. new home sales, U.S. Conf. Board consumer confidence

South Africa leading indicator

Finland unemployment

Wednesday, Oct. 27

Economic Data/Events

UK Chancellor of Exchequer Rishi Sunak to unveil the government’s autumn budget including new forecasts from the Office of Budget Responsibility.

US wholesale inventories, U.S. durable goods

Bank of Canada (BOC) rate decision: Expected to keep interest rate steady at 0.25%

New Zealand trade, ANZ business confidence

Australia CPI

China industrial profits

Germany GfK consumer confidence

Thailand manufacturing production index, capacity utilization

Mexico trade

Russia industrial production, CPI (weekly)

France PPI

Turkey trade, economic confidence

EIA Crude Oil Inventory Report

Thursday, Oct. 28

Economic Data/Events

US Q3 Advance GDP Q/Q: 3.0%e v 6.7% prior, initial jobless claims

BOJ rate decision: No change in policy expected, could lower growth forecast for this year and raise 2022 forecast

Japan retail sales

ECB rate decision: No change to policy, possibly setting up December as pivotal meeting for a decision on APP; President Lagarde holds a post-rate decision press conference

Eurozone economic confidence, consumer confidence

Germany CPI, unemployment

Australia export and import price indexes

Singapore unemployment

Russia forex and gold reserves

Sweden GDP, retail sales

South Africa PPI

Apple and Amazon report earnings after the bell

Turkey central bank Governor Kavcioglu discusses inflation 

EU economy and finance ministers meet online to talk about the implementation of the recovery and resilience facility.

Friday, Oct. 29

Economic Data/Events

G-20 joint finance and health ministers meet before the weekend leaders’ summit

US consumer income, University of Michigan consumer sentiment

Eurozone GDP, CPI

UK mortgage approvals, money supply, consumer credit

Germany GDP

Czech Republic GDP

Mexico GDP

France GDP, CPI

Italy GDP, CPI

Poland CPI

Russia unemployment

South Africa trade balance, private credit, money supply, budget balance

Japan unemployment, Tokyo CPI, industrial production, housing starts

Australia retail sales, private sector credit, PPI

Singapore money supply

India fiscal deficit, eight infrastructure industries

Hong Kong money supply, budget balance

New Zealand ANC consumer confidence

Thailand trade, BoP, trade, foreign reserves, forward contracts

Russia consumer data

Sovereign Rating Updates

– Germany (Fitch)

– Czech Republic (S&P)

– Poland (Moody’s)

– Norway (Moody’s) 

– Italy (DBRS)















Author: Craig Erlam

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