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Dow Jones, the S&P 500, and Nasdaq price forecast ahead of a busy week

Wall Street’s three main indexes had a third straight week of gains for the first time since early July; the S&P 500 index rose 1.6%; the Dow Jones…

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This article was originally published by Invezz - Market Analysis

Wall Street’s three main indexes had a third straight week of gains for the first time since early July; the S&P 500 index rose 1.6%; the Dow Jones Industrial Average advanced 1.1%, while the Nasdaq Composite Index gained 1.3%.

Disappointing quarterly reports from Snap and Intel put pressure on the S&P 500 and Nasdaq on Friday, but both indexes continue to trade in a bull market.

The U.S. economy remains stable, and according to research company Refinitiv, third-quarter S&P 500 earnings should show a 34.8% rise from a year ago, up from an expected 31.9% rise at the beginning of the week.

Results from many big companies provided a strong start to third-quarter earnings, and investors’ focus will remain on the third-quarter earnings season because many companies have yet to publish their reports.

Next week, General Electric, Advanced Micro Devices, Alphabet Inc (GOOG), Microsoft, Twitter, Visa, Coca – Cola, Boeing, Facebook, McDonald’s, Ford, and Amazon are among the companies scheduled to report quarterly results.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell said on Friday that the U.S. central bank is “on track” to begin reducing its purchases of assets and though monetary tightening is usually seen as a drag on stocks, some investors view the Fed’s stance as a vote of confidence for the U.S. economy.

Tom Mantione, managing director of UBS Private Wealth Management, said:

Stocks are climbing to new highs, and anytime the market is trading at or near its all-time high, it is not unusual to see a little bit of more intraday volatility…and it should not concern investors.

Several FED officials also expressed concerns about high inflation which could force the U.S. central bank to raise rates sooner than anticipated. It is also important to say that the Initial Jobless Claims for the week ended October 15 fell to 290K, which is the lowest number since the pandemic began.

On the other side, supply chain issues represent a serious problem for the economy, but the pace of recovery is likely sufficient for Fed officials to follow through on plans to announce tapering at the November FOMC meeting.

The upcoming week will be a busy one; the U.S. will publish the preliminary estimate of Q3 Gross Domestic Product while the quarterly results of many big companies will take center stage.

S&P 500 up 1.6% on a weekly basis

For the week, S&P 500 (SPX) booked a 1.6% increase and closed at 4,544 points.

Data source: tradingview.com

The S&P 500 index continues to trade in a bull market, but if the price falls below 4,400 points, it would be a “sell” signal, and we have the open way to 4,200 points. The current resistance level stands at 4,600 points, and if the price jumps above this level, we have the open way to 4,700 points.

DJIA up  1.1% on a weekly basis

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) advanced 1.1% for the week and closed at 35,677 points.

Data source: tradingview.com

DJIA continues to trade near record highs; still, if the price falls below 34,000 points, it would be a strong “sell” signal.

Nasdaq Composite up 1.3% on a weekly basis

For the week, the Nasdaq Composite (COMP) booked a 1.3% increase and closed at 15,090 points.

Data source: tradingview.com

If the price jumps above 15,500 points, it would be a bullish confirmation for this index. The current support level stands at 14,500 points, and if the price falls below this level, it would be a strong “sell” signal.

Summary

Wall Street’s three main indexes had a third straight week of gains, and Fed Chair Jerome Powell said on Friday that the U.S. central bank is “on track” to begin reducing its purchases of assets. The upcoming week will be a busy one; the U.S. will publish the preliminary estimate of Q3 Gross Domestic Product while the quarterly results of many big companies will take center stage.

The post Dow Jones, the S&P 500, and Nasdaq price forecast ahead of a busy week appeared first on Invezz.




Author: Stanko Iliev

Economics

New Zealand cash rates – the canary in the coal mine?

My son, Angus, ventured into the Sydney residential market at the beginning of the year acquiring a small apartment, with what I considered to be an enormous…

My son, Angus, ventured into the Sydney residential market at the beginning of the year acquiring a small apartment, with what I considered to be an enormous loan from one of the Big Four. At the time the fixed four-year home loan rate was around 1.95 per cent per annum. Today, the advertised rate has jumped 1.0 per cent per annum to around 2.95 per cent. This reflects the Australian four-year Government Bond yield moving up from 0.20 per cent at the beginning of 2021 to the current 1.32 per cent.

The likely response to this change from property buyers today is that a much higher proportion of their mortgage will be attributed to a variable home loan. This rate typically reflects the Reserve Bank of Australia’s (RBA) cash rate, and at 0.10 per cent per annum it is currently at a record low, and well below the “emergency low” of 3.0 per cent per annum implemented during the Global Financial Crisis (6 months to September 2009).

Across the ditch, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) has raised its official cash rate for the second time in two months by 0.25 per cent to 0.75 per cent per annum to counter growing inflation, which hit 4.9 per cent in the September 2021 quarter, and is expected increase to 5.7 percent in the March 2022 quarter.

RBA vs RBNZ cash rate

Markets are currently pricing in five more 0.25 per cent increases by the RBNZ over the next twelve months to a targeted 2.0 per cent per annum. Will New Zealand be seen as a canary of the coal mine moment given inflation has become a global problem? Only time will tell, however if cash rates happen to jump by 1.5 per cent and this filters through into the rate for variable home loans. The tailwinds currently being enjoyed by asset owners (with debt) – close to nil interest rates – could easily become headwinds.

The US inflation figure for October 2021 hit 6.2 per cent, a 30 year high.  Selected CPI subcategories saw the following 12 month changes: Beef +24 per cent, gasoline +51 per cent, natural gas +28 per cent and used cars and trucks +26 per cent. The UK was not far behind, with an inflation rate of 4.2 per cent for October.

ds-us-inflation-2021-2

Global supply chain bottlenecks and shifting consumer demand from services to goods could well be transitory, but as the Founder of Bridgewater Associates, Ray Dalio, warns, “raging inflation” is eroding people’s wealth today – particularly those who have their money in cash.




Author: David Buckland

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Economics

Dow Jones, the S&P 500, and Nasdaq price forecast after sell-off on Friday

Wall Street’s three main indexes ended sharply lower on Friday as news of a new COVID variant worried investors around the world. The World Health Organization…

Wall Street’s three main indexes ended sharply lower on Friday as news of a new COVID variant worried investors around the world.

The World Health Organization (WHO) on Friday designated a new COVID-19 variant detected in South Africa, and a lot of people didn’t want to hold risk assets on Monday morning or are afraid of what that could look like Monday morning.

Markets are reacting negatively because it is unknown at this point to what degree the vaccines will be effective against the new strain and would it initiate new lockdowns around the world. David Kotok, chairman and chief investment officer at Cumberland Advisors, added:

All policy issues, meaning monetary policy, business trajectories, GDP growth estimates, leisure, and hospitality recovery, the list goes on, are on hold. The new strain may complicate the outlook for how aggressively the Federal Reserve normalizes monetary policy to fight inflation.

The new Omicron coronavirus is detected in Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Germany, Israel, Belgium, Botswana, Denmark, Hong Kong, and Australia for now.

Britain has already imposed travel restrictions on southern Africa, while the European Commission is considering suspending travel from countries where the new variant has been identified.

The upcoming week will be busy, and investors will pay attention to Fed Chair Jerome Powell and U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen’s appearance before Congress to discuss the government’s COVID response on November 30.

S&P 500 down -2.3% on Friday

 S&P 500 (SPX ) weakened by -2.3% on Friday and closed the week at 4,594 points.

Data source: tradingview.com

If the price falls below 4,500 points, it would be a strong “sell” signal, and we have the open way to 4,300 or even 4,200 points.

The upside potential remains limited for the week ahead, but if the price jumps above 4,650 points, the next target could be around 4,700 points.

DJIA down -2.5% on Friday

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) weakened -2.5% on Friday and closed the week below 35,000 points.

Data source: tradingview.com

The Dow Jones Industrial Average remains under pressure as news of a new COVID variant worried investors worldwide.

The current support level stands at 34,500 points, and if the price falls below this level, the next target could be around 34,000 points.

Nasdaq Composite down -2.2% on Friday

Nasdaq Composite (COMP) has lost -2.2% on Friday and closed the week at 15,491 points.

Data source: tradingview.com

The strong support level stands at 15,000 points, and if the price falls below this level, it could be a sign of a much larger drop.

Summary

Wall Street’s three main indexes ended sharply lower on Friday after the news that the World Health Organization designated a new COVID-19 variant detected in South Africa. All policy issues go on hold currently, and investors will pay attention to the government’s COVID response on November 30.

The post Dow Jones, the S&P 500, and Nasdaq price forecast after sell-off on Friday appeared first on Invezz.







Author: Stanko Iliev

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Economics

Wind Power Becoming too Cheap for Industry to Sustain Itself

The price of generating wind power has gotten so low, that companies may soon be unable to invest in additional
The post Wind Power Becoming too Cheap…

The price of generating wind power has gotten so low, that companies may soon be unable to invest in additional technologies for the sector.

According to major turbine-making company Siemens Gamesa, the cost of wind power has recently dropped to such a low level that it can finally challenge the fossil fuel industry, mostly due to an abundance of investments in renewable energy. “What we’ve clearly achieved is that wind power is now cheaper than anything else,” said the company’s CEO Andreas Nauen as quoted by Reuters.

However, Nauen warned that “we shouldn’t make it too cheap,” because it could hinder the influx of additional investments in the green space. Across Europe, both wind and solar are substantially cheaper that natural gas, coal, and even nuclear power. And, with governments’ strong ambitions to adopt a climate friendly agenda, the demand for wind turbines has reached a record-high; but, the relatively lower prices and increased competition have also eroded away at producers’ margins.

“We have probably driven it too far,” said Nauen, adding that if prices continue to decline, the sector won’t be able to invest in further innovations. To make matters worse, accelerating global inflation for raw materials, coupled with supply shortages, also threatens to squeeze turbine makers’ margins. Moreover, governments around the world have begun eliminating generous wind subsidies in favour of more competitive contracts submitted by the lowest bids.

“We need to change auction systems in the future,” said Nauen, suggesting that local job creation should be governments’ top priority, rather than just the lowest price.


Information for this briefing was found via Reuters. The author has no securities or affiliations related to this organization. Not a recommendation to buy or sell. Always do additional research and consult a professional before purchasing a security. The author holds no licenses.

The post Wind Power Becoming too Cheap for Industry to Sustain Itself appeared first on the deep dive.

Author: Hermina Paull

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