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Will More Companies Start Hoarding Gold?

A rising U.S. Dollar Index is putting downward pressure on hard assets markets this week. Dollar bulls are counting on the Federal Reserve to start tightening…

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Welcome to this week’s Market Wrap Podcast, I’m Mike Gleason.

A rising U.S. Dollar Index is putting downward pressure on hard assets markets this week.

Dollar bulls are counting on the Federal Reserve to start tightening its ultra-loose monetary policy. They expect the Fed to begin tapering its monthly asset purchases later this year.

Minutes released on Wednesday from the FOMC’s latest meeting suggest policymakers are leaning in that direction.

But there is a massive gulf between beginning to taper bond purchases and finally hiking their benchmark interest rate several times to exceed the inflation rate. Anything short of a positive real Fed funds rate still represents accommodative monetary policy. And that will be in place for the foreseeable future.

The Fed can be counted on to continue to debase the currency. What’s less certain is whether other national fiat currencies will fall or rise in exchange rates versus the U.S. dollar. But over time, they will all fall versus real assets as inflation persists.

Traders in fast-moving markets can be very short-sighted, though, especially if they are employing leverage. Commodities and precious metals futures markets got hit with lots of sell orders this week, although gold prices are holding up fairly well here.

The yellow metal currently checks in at $1,786 per ounce, unchanged for the week.

Gold sometimes serves as a sort of safe haven within the hard assets space. And that was true this week as crude oil, copper, and the white metals all got hammered.

Silver prices are down 2.8% since last Friday’s close to trade at $23.17. Platinum is a 4.0% loser this week to come in at $1,002. And finally, palladium is getting pummeled by 13.5% or more than $350 to come in at $2,322 per ounce as of this Friday morning recording.

Even as the precious metals sector is currently out of favor among mainstream investors, contrarians are seizing the opportunity to accumulate. Some big institutional buyers are entering the market.

The technology company Palantir purchased $50 million worth of gold bars this month. The news surprised and confused some of the talking heads on CNBC. But analyst Guy Adami stepped in to explain why physical gold makes sense in an environment of uncertainty and inflationary monetary policy.

CNBC News Report: Data analytics company Palantir buying more than $50 million worth of... get this… gold bars in August, according to a regulatory filing. The company is able to take physical possession of the gold at any time with reasonable notice.

CNBC Talking Head: I don't recall ever seeing this except for maybe a gold related company, and that would be a raw material or work in process or inventory or something. It's interesting. It's sort of surprising. It's kind of (like), we were expecting like a Bitcoin or something like that or an altcoin.

Guy Adami - CNBC: Notice that they didn't buy the gold ETF, they bought actual physical bars of gold. It's fascinating. There's no con... Listen. I mean, I could talk about this for an hour and we only have a minute left. But I would say this is one of those days you bookmark. This is them saying, you know what? Central banks are out of control black Swan event. Good for them. And my sense is you're going to see more of that.

Exchange-traded products that track gold prices are ultimately still financial assets. They have counterparty risks, including credit risk.

If an investor’s objective in owning precious metals is to diversify out of the financial system, then only physical ownership held securely outside of Wall Street brokerage houses and banks will do.

Seasoned precious metals investors keep their focus on their long-term objective. They don’t seek financial substitutes. Nor do they wait to buy until mainstream media headlines to tell them the gold market is hot.

Instead, they accumulate low-premium bullion products over time – ideally when prices are pulling back and the market is quiet – aiming to get the most ounces for their dollars.

But they know that trying to perfectly time the market is virtually impossible. Nobody knows when the next black swan event or other catalyst will ignite a major metals rally.

It’s prudent to always hold a core position and ideally be able to add to it regularly.

Money Metals Exchange has a simple way for you to purchase bullion each month – automatically and at a discount. It’s our Monthly Savings Plan.

Every month, Money Metals will deliver beautiful gold and silver bullion products directly to you. Or you can store your metals holdings securely at Money Metals Depository. We offer high security storage in our state-of-the-art facility.

Just choose the monthly dollar amount you wish to invest, which can be as little as $100. Or choose the number of ounces you want to buy. We offer silver bars, silver rounds, silver Eagles and other government minted silver coins, as well as a variety of sizes of gold all the way down to a gram. You can accumulate as little as 2 grams of gold per month if you wish.

The advantages of putting your bullion accumulation on auto pilot include not having to guess when to buy and never second guessing your timing.

It’s a stress free and prudent way of accumulating a position over time. You dollar cost average into the market regardless of where prices are trending.

Participants in our monthly plan also gain access to even lower premiums than those available to the general public!

You can enroll online or through one of our specialists by calling 1-800-800-1865.

Well, that will do it for this week. Be sure to check back next Friday for our next Weekly Market Wrap Podcast. Until then this has been Mike Gleason with Money Metals Exchange, thanks for listening and have a weekend everybody.

      

Economics

US indices close week mixed, weighed down by tech stocks

Benchmark US indices closed the trading week mixed on Friday September 24 pulled down by losses in technology and healthcare sectors amid mixed global…

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Benchmark US indices closed the trading week mixed on Friday, September 24, pulled down by losses in technology and healthcare sectors amid mixed global cues.

The S&P 500 was up 0.15% to 4,455.48. The Dow Jones rose 0.10% to 34,798.00. The NASDAQ Composite fell 0.03% to 15,047.70, and the small-cap Russell 2000 was down 0.49% to 2,248.07.

Global markets remained volatile this week amid mixed cues. US stocks wavered after news that Chinese real estate giant Evergrande Group was on the brink of a major default.

Its US$300 billion debt bomb has sent shockwaves across the global markets. On Thursday, it entered a 30-day grace period after missing an interest payment deadline.

The Fed's sooner-than-expected timeline for stimulus tapering also weighed on investors' minds. The central bank said this week that it is considering withdrawing its bond-buying program by November. Consequently, an interest rate hike may be imminent.

Separately, the Biden administration is also planning to increase the corporate tax. It is currently debating a spending bill, which is expected to outline the program.

On Friday, the energy and financial stocks were the top gainers on S&P 500 index. Real estate and healthcare stocks were the bottom movers. Six of the 11 index segments stayed in the green.

Shares of Nike, Inc (NKE) fell 6.17% after it lowered its sales forecast. The company said it is facing challenges to meet the demand for shoes and athlete wear due to delays in production and shipping. Nevertheless, its revenue jumped 16% YoY to US$12.2 billion in Q1, FY22.

Meredith Corporation (MDP) stock rose 25.27 percent after news that the magazine publisher is in advanced talks for its purchase by media and internet holding company IAC/InterActiveCorp.

In the healthcare sector, Moderna Inc. (MRNA) fell 4.65%, Dexcom Inc. (DXCM) shed 2.25%, and Waters Corporation (WAT) fell 1.78%. Resmed Inc. (RMD) and Boston Scientific Corporation (BSX) ticked down 1.37% and 1.06%, respectively.

In technology stocks, Enphase Energy Inc (ENPH) declined 3.04%, NVIDIA Corp (NVDA) fell 1.89%, and Adobe Inc. (ADBE) declined 1.48%. Accenture plc (ACN) shed 1.20%, and Salesforce.com Inc. (CRM) gained 2.47%.

In the energy sector, ConocoPhillips (COP) rose 2.43%, EOG Resources Inc. (EOG) gained 2.45%, and Baker Hughes Co (BKR) gained 1.25%. Hess Corporation (HES) and Pioneer Natural Resources Company (PXD) advanced 1.10 and 3.21%, respectively.

In the crypto market, prices tumbled after the Central Bank of China declared crypto transactions illegal. Bitcoin (BTC) fell 5.49%, Ethereum (ETH) fell 7.74%, and Dogecoin (DOGE) declined 6.82%.

Also read: With chipmakers in the spotlight, here’s a peek at five of them

Also read: Top five communication stocks that rode the Q2 rebound

Six of the 11 segments of the S&P 500 index stayed in the green.

Also read: Why are Salesforce (CRM), Affirm (AFRM) stocks in limelight today?

 Futures & Commodities

Gold futures were up 0.03% to US$1,750.40 per ounce. Silver decreased by 1.21% to US$22.405 per ounce, while copper rose 1.20% to US$4.2817.

Brent oil futures increased by 1.04% to US$78.05 per barrel and WTI crude was up 0.93% to US$73.98.

Also Read: In the Spotlight: Top 50 US startups in 2021

Bond Market

The 30-year Treasury bond yields was up 3.15% to 1.985, while the 10-year bond yields rose 3.02% to 1.453.

US Dollar Futures Index increased by 0.27% to US$93.278.

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Economics

China Is Responsible For More Than A Third Of World GDP Growth – This Is A Problem

China Is Responsible For More Than A Third Of World GDP Growth – This Is A Problem

As Deutsche Bank’s FX strategist George Saravelos writes…

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China Is Responsible For More Than A Third Of World GDP Growth - This Is A Problem

As Deutsche Bank's FX strategist George Saravelos writes in a recent research report he has been "on the pessimistic side of the reflation narrative for some time now."

In the note titled "three charts for pessimists", he admits that there are many more things happening to the global economy than easy fiscal and monetary policy, including a large negative supply-shock, in turn leading to sizeable demand destruction; stronger than expected precautionary saving behavior from consumers pushing down r*; and massive structural economic change on the back of COVID-led digitization across multiple sectors. And now we have to add China to the mix.

His first chart below highlights a simple observation: China has been acting as a massive global growth turbocharge since the start of the century, and is responsible for more than a third of world GDP growth. As Saravelos gloomily notes, "systemic risks of the unfolding property developer crisis aside, if the last few months experience are signaling a regime break in Chinese tolerance for what authorities have termed "low quality" growth, the world should take notice."

Back to the developed world, Saravelos' second chart shows there is still a massive hole in the UK labor market. Total hours worked are a whopping near-10% below trend compared to pre-COVID. Yet the market is now fully pricing a Bank of England rate hike early next year. For sure, wages are rising, but as a recent IFS study showed there are still massive disruptions in the UK labor market. It will take a brave central bank to hike in to such a hole. Even if it does, it is hardly positive for the currency.

Finally, there are two parallel universes. The global goods sector is overheated. Look no further than US consumption, which is half a trillion dollars above trend. But the US services sector is twice as large and half a trillion below trend. The analytical value of aggregate GDP metrics is severely lessened in the presence of such massive sectoral dislocations. In recent months, the goods sector has started decelerating faster than the services sector has quickened. How the consumer rebalances spending in coming months will be very important.

We are only at the very beginning of trying to understand the true post-COVID steady state, it will be a long ride.

Tyler Durden Fri, 09/24/2021 - 20:20
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Economics

Finally The Taper Tantrum, Or What’s Wrong With August?

If you’re fortunate to be able to do this long enough, you’re absolutely assured to get caught with your pants down and almost certainly more than once….

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If you’re fortunate to be able to do this long enough, you’re absolutely assured to get caught with your pants down and almost certainly more than once. In the short run, it’s all a crapshoot anyway. Markets fluctuate and never, ever go in a straight line. And just when you claim to be right on top, they yank the rug right out from under your conceit(s).

I’ve spent the past few weeks, really months pointing out how Federal Reserve policymakers via their compliant media hasn’t been able to provoke anything out of bonds. Not for lack of trying. Zilch. Nada. Forget tantrum, a whole lot of nothing even though taper – we’re always told – would spell the death of the bond “bull.” I’ve been almost gleefully highlighting how this policy farce has been greeted as a complete non-issue across all of those markets.

Until yesterday.

Finally, yields backed up both then and today in a notable selloff. Is this the long-awaited tantrum? Could it be something else?

For the former, start with Fed Governor Christopher Waller. Recall on August 2nd how Mr. Waller had appeared on CNBC and became the first voting FOMC member to encourage not just taper but a very quick one so as to clear enough calendar for a hard 2022 liftoff in rates.

Just two days later, it might appear his “go early, go fast” mantra caught on with at least some parts of the yield curve. From August 5 forward, the long end of the Treasury curve has been backing up from that recent mid-year low. August 4 was the last time before what is now a multi-week somewhat modest possibly reflationary action.

Before crowning Waller’s confidence, that particular date – August 4 – should ring a bell. Wasn’t it just last year, 2020, that longer-term bond yields had likewise bottomed out on this same day?

Yes, yes it was:



Obviously, the past two years began under very different circumstances; 2020 taking over from 2019 already close if not in recession (especially outside the US) and then the COVID errors. This year, 2021, opened in nearly opposite fashion with allegedly the whole world picking itself back up from all that damage and doing so boosted by every “stimulus” means known to man. Not just rebound, a fiery inflation-filled recovery. 

Yet, in the middle of both there’s more the same than different – questions about the initial “V” shaped recovery (which did not pan out) last year and then a pretty conspicuous “growth scare” this year many are plain hoping they can blame on delta COVID for the “unexpected” soft patch.

You probably also remember how that same label “growth scare” was also thrown around quite liberally in 2019, too. Back then, the only part of the yield curve anyone is told to pay attention to had inverted, not just provoking rate cuts out of a befuddled Jay Powell but raising mainstream alarms as to impending recession (which may actually have happened, but we’ll never know for sure given the timing of the coronavirus pandemic).

Wouldn’t you know it, the low point for LT UST’s in 2019 turned out to have been…August 28!



If twice could be random coincidence, yet three times is a pattern, what is four or five? Believe it or not, this same calendar shape can be found inside every one of the last five years – even 2018 when yields were more distorted as they neared their Reflation #3 peak. That year, the same sort of mid-year downward drift reaching its floor by August 20, 2018.

And the year before, during globally synchronized growth’s reported arrival, UST rates were, for the most part, moving lower (curve flattening) as the market kept rejecting the idea that there was some legitimately inflationary recovery taking shape. The low in yields for 2017? September 5 (OK, so not August but more than close enough).



Even 2015 and 2016 were pretty close in matching this seasonality; during the latter, yields bottomed out early July and then went up (a lot) later in the Autumn. The year before, 2015, as Euro$ #3 “matured”, again a mid-year low on August 24 (following CNY’s big theatrics) which had been the same day as the eurodollar shortage striking Wall Street equities (flash crash).

While there were a couple days later on in 2015 when the 10-year yield dropped a few bps lower than August 24, still the same general trend overall.

And that trend seems to have become intriguingly normal, manifested as a regular uptick in yields especially during September and October and then lasting through the end of each year (2018 the obvious exception given the eruption of Euro$ #4’s landmine). Quite simple enough, LT yields go up after August

Given this clear regularity, could any of these annual BOND ROUTs!!!! be considered reflationary?

Getting back to the original question, there’s quite a lot of evidence for something(s) other than Governor Waller’s melodramatic CNBC interview – or even the taper announcement and dots this week – which seems more likely to account for the bond market’s longer end behavior over the past five weeks. And this would also encompass the “big” selloff yesterday and today.

These last two days, then, have not been some unusual, tantrum-y eruption (look above at how far yields jumped in early September 2019 even as recession moved into the global forefront). Quite to the contrary, what’s happened so far over the past two months is entirely consistent with what seems to happen every year. Taper doesn’t. 

This could even mean I’m actually off-the-hook, my britches still fashioned tightly right where they need to be. The Fed’s people will continue trying to provoke a bond tantrum because of their need for the public to believe taper is in charge of interest rates, yet right at this moment there’s only evidence that bonds are just doing what they normally do without regard for dots and QE’s.

This only raises the question, of course, what the hell must be going on during the month of August? Sorry for the cliffhanger, but that I’ll save for another day. Feel free, however, to tweet or comment your theories and hopefully during next week’s podcast Emil Kalinowski and I will be able to discuss them.

 



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