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Mapped: Solar Power by Country in 2021

In 2020, solar power saw its largest-ever annual capacity expansion at 127 gigawatts. Here’s a snapshot of solar power capacity by country.
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Mapped: Solar Power by Country in 2021

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The world is adopting renewable energy at an unprecedented pace, and solar power is the energy source leading the way.

Despite a 4.5% fall in global energy demand in 2020, renewable energy technologies showed promising progress. While the growth in renewables was strong across the board, solar power led from the front with 127 gigawatts installed in 2020, its largest-ever annual capacity expansion.

The above infographic uses data from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) to map solar power capacity by country in 2021. This includes both solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power capacity.

The Solar Power Leaderboard

From the Americas to Oceania, countries in virtually every continent (except Antarctica) added more solar to their mix last year. Here’s a snapshot of solar power capacity by country at the beginning of 2021:

Country Installed capacity, megawatts Watts* per capita % of world total
China 254,355 147 35.6%
U.S. 75,572 231 10.6%
Japan 67,000 498 9.4%
Germany 53,783 593 7.5%
India 39,211 32 5.5%
Italy 21,600 345 3.0%
Australia 17,627 637 2.5%
Vietnam 16,504 60 2.3%
South Korea 14,575 217 2.0%
Spain 14,089 186 2.0%
United Kingdom 13,563 200 1.9%
France 11,733 148 1.6%
Netherlands 10,213 396 1.4%
Brazil 7,881 22 1.1%
Turkey 6,668 73 0.9%
South Africa 5,990 44 0.8%
Taiwan 5,817 172 0.8%
Belgium 5,646 394 0.8%
Mexico 5,644 35 0.8%
Ukraine 5,360 114 0.8%
Poland 3,936 34 0.6%
Canada 3,325 88 0.5%
Greece 3,247 258 0.5%
Chile 3,205 142 0.4%
Switzerland 3,118 295 0.4%
Thailand 2,988 43 0.4%
United Arab Emirates 2,539 185 0.4%
Austria 2,220 178 0.3%
Czech Republic 2,073 194 0.3%
Hungary 1,953 131 0.3%
Egypt 1,694 17 0.2%
Malaysia 1,493 28 0.2%
Israel 1,439 134 0.2%
Russia 1,428 7 0.2%
Sweden 1,417 63 0.2%
Romania 1,387 71 0.2%
Jordan 1,359 100 0.2%
Denmark 1,300 186 0.2%
Bulgaria 1,073 152 0.2%
Philippines 1,048 9 0.1%
Portugal 1,025 81 0.1%
Argentina 764 17 0.1%
Pakistan 737 6 0.1%
Morocco 734 6 0.1%
Slovakia 593 87 0.1%
Honduras 514 53 0.1%
Algeria 448 10 0.1%
El Salvador 429 66 0.1%
Iran 414 5 0.1%
Saudi Arabia 409 12 0.1%
Finland 391 39 0.1%
Dominican Republic 370 34 0.1%
Peru 331 10 0.05%
Singapore 329 45 0.05%
Bangladesh 301 2 0.04%
Slovenia 267 128 0.04%
Uruguay 256 74 0.04%
Yemen 253 8 0.04%
Iraq 216 5 0.03%
Cambodia 208 12 0.03%
Cyprus 200 147 0.03%
Panama 198 46 0.03%
Luxembourg 195 244 0.03%
Malta 184 312 0.03%
Indonesia 172 1 0.02%
Cuba 163 14 0.02%
Belarus 159 17 0.02%
Senegal 155 8 0.02%
Norway 152 17 0.02%
Lithuania 148 37 0.02%
Namibia 145 55 0.02%
New Zealand 142 29 0.02%
Estonia 130 98 0.02%
Bolivia 120 10 0.02%
Oman 109 21 0.02%
Colombia 107 2 0.01%
Kenya 106 2 0.01%
Guatemala 101 6 0.01%
Croatia 85 17 0.01%
World total 713,970 83 100.0%

*1 megawatt = 1,000,000 watts.

China is the undisputed leader in solar installations, with over 35% of global capacity. What’s more, the country is showing no signs of slowing down. It has the world’s largest wind and solar project in the pipeline, which could add another 400,000MW to its clean energy capacity.

Following China from afar is the U.S., which recently surpassed 100,000MW of solar power capacity after installing another 50,000MW in the first three months of 2021. Annual solar growth in the U.S. has averaged an impressive 42% over the last decade. Policies like the solar investment tax credit, which offers a 26% tax credit on residential and commercial solar systems, have helped propel the industry forward.

Although Australia hosts a fraction of China’s solar capacity, it tops the per capita rankings due to its relatively low population of 26 million people. The Australian continent receives the highest amount of solar radiation of any continent, and over 30% of Australian households now have rooftop solar PV systems.

China: The Solar Champion

In 2020, President Xi Jinping stated that China aims to be carbon neutral by 2060, and the country is taking steps to get there.

China is a leader in the solar industry, and it seems to have cracked the code for the entire solar supply chain. In 2019, Chinese firms produced 66% of the world’s polysilicon, the initial building block of silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) panels. Furthermore, more than three-quarters of solar cells came from China, along with 72% of the world’s PV panels.

With that said, it’s no surprise that 5 of the world’s 10 largest solar parks are in China, and it will likely continue to build more as it transitions to carbon neutrality.

What’s Driving the Rush for Solar Power?

The energy transition is a major factor in the rise of renewables, but solar’s growth is partly due to how cheap it has become over time. Solar energy costs have fallen exponentially over the last decade, and it’s now the cheapest source of new energy generation.

Since 2010, the cost of solar power has seen a 85% decrease, down from $0.28 to $0.04 per kWh. According to MIT researchers, economies of scale have been the single-largest factor in continuing the cost decline for the last decade. In other words, as the world installed and made more solar panels, production became cheaper and more efficient.

This year, solar costs are rising due to supply chain issues, but the rise is likely to be temporary as bottlenecks resolve.

The post Mapped: Solar Power by Country in 2021 appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

Author: Govind Bhutada

Energy & Critical Metals

US Coal Is Making A Transitory Comeback

US Coal Is Making A Transitory Comeback

Authored by Tsvetana Paraskova via OilPrice.com,

U.S. coal miners, who have already benefited from…

US Coal Is Making A Transitory Comeback

Authored by Tsvetana Paraskova via OilPrice.com,

  • U.S. coal miners, who have already benefited from rising demand from utilities this year, are in for at least another year of strong sales and cash flows

  • Much higher natural gas prices are making more power generators switch to coal

  • Annual U.S. coal-fired electricity generation is set to rise this year for the first time since 2014

While the U.S. Administration is pushing its green energy agenda and wants to decarbonize the power grid by 2035, coal is making a comeback this year as high natural gas prices incentivize more coal use in electricity generation.

This could be coal’s last hurrah, as the fossil fuel is still set for a continuous decline over the medium and long term, analysts say, amid the global push toward clean energy and the ESG trend that restricts investment and access to finance in the coal industry.  

Still, U.S. coal miners, who have already benefited from rising demand from utilities this year, are in for at least another year of strong sales and cash flows as the much higher natural gas prices this year compared to 2020 are making more power generators switch to coal.

Annual U.S. coal-fired electricity generation is set to rise this year for the first time since 2014, and the share of coal in America’s power generation mix is set to rise to 23 percent in 2021 from 20 percent in 2020 as electricity demand rebounds and the delivered natural gas price for electricity generators more than doubles, according to EIA estimates.

Coal Demand Is Rising Amid High Natural Gas Prices

Rising demand for coal and muted supply response have depleted U.S. coal stocks to their lowest levels since the early 1970s. As utilities scrambled to secure supply ahead of the winter, coal prices in the United States were estimated to have hit last month the highest level since 2009.

The rise of coal this year also highlights a key challenge ahead for the green energy transition: a shift to cleaner energy will not happen overnight and keeping the lights on in America still needs a lot of coal and natural gas, regardless of the U.S. Administration’s long-term policies.  

The U.S. still gets over 60 percent of its electricity generation from fossil fuels, 40 percent of which was natural gas and 20 percent coal in 2020.

This year, the EIA estimates the share of gas dropping to an average of 36 percent from 39 percent last year, but coal’s share rising by 3 percentage points to 23 percent. The share of renewables, including hydropower, is expected to remain basically flat on the year at 20 percent, EIA’s latest Short-Term Energy Outlook showed.

U.S. Coal Stocks Lowest Since the 1970s

“U.S. coal production growth has not kept pace with rising domestic demand for steam coal in the electric power sector and export growth, leading to a draw down in coal inventories held by the electric power sector,” the EIA said in the STEO in November.

Coal inventories at utilities stood in August 2021 at lowest levels since the early 1970s, according to EIA data in its latest Monthly Energy Review.

Stocks are now some two-thirds of the five-year average for this time of year, The Wall Street Journal points out.   

In view of the lowest coal stocks in decades, PJM Interconnection, which coordinates wholesale electricity in all or parts of 13 states and the District of Columbia and serves a fifth of U.S. residents, said in October that until April 1, 2022, it could ask coal-fired plants to conserve stocks and curb operations if their respective remaining resources fall below 10 days worth of supply.

“This would only be implemented to address concerns with local or regional reliability,” PJM said.   

“Christmas Has Come Early” For U.S. Coal Miners

Rising coal demand and the highest coal prices in more than a decade are boosting the profitability of the large U.S. coal miners, which sell their production in advance and are now looking to lock in higher prices for the next two years in negotiations with utilities.  

“I’m reminded of that line, which goes who says Christmas, can’t come a little early. We are now three quarters through having our best year financial and operational performance since we went public,” Randy Atkins, CEO at Ramaco Resources, said on the Q3 earnings call last month.

The U.S. coal industry is almost sold out for 2022 as high natural gas prices have incentivized more coal-fired generation this year.

The outlook of many U.S. coal miners for 2022 and 2023 is positive, although long-term uncertainty over the role of coal is only rising. 

“The reality is, there’s just been very limited investment in new coal production really everywhere domestically and as well as internationally. And as a result, there is a bit of a scramble right now as generators look to find additional volumes with gas prices, as higher as they are at around $5,” Deck Slone, Senior Vice President, Strategy at Arch, said at the end of October.

“Business conditions in the Powder River Basin are temporarily strong on a variety of factors including high natural gas pricing in regions that consume PRB coal that encourages gas-to-coal switching by power generators and various logistical issues present across the region that limits the coal industry’s ability to produce and deliver coal,” Moody’s said in early November when it revised the rating outlook on Arch Resources to positive from stable.

Coal Still On Track For Long-Term Decline

Despite the generally bullish outlook for U.S. coal through 2023, the industry is still set for a decline in the long term due to the push for more renewable energy generation and the ESG investment community shunning fossil fuels, especially coal.   

“Moody’s believes that investor concerns about the coal industry’s ESG profile are still intensifying and, notwithstanding current strength in coal pricing and better debt trading levels, coal producers will be increasingly challenged by access to capital issues in the early-to-mid 2020s,” the rating agency noted.

“Looking forward, the Biden administration’s domestic energy policy agenda, combined with ESG obsessions in Europe and the United States, will most likely continue to restrict growth in fossil fuel production. Absent any significant global demand destruction, we expect fossil fuel prices will remain at elevated levels through next year and into 2023,” Alliance Resource’s CEO Joe Craft said on the Q3 call.  

This year’s rise in coal power generation in the U.S. is unlikely to continue, with generation from coal plants next year expected down by 5 percent from 2021 due to continuing retirements of coal capacity and slightly lower natural gas prices, the EIA says.  

Tyler Durden
Sun, 12/05/2021 – 15:30

Author: Tyler Durden

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Energy & Critical Metals

Cypress Development kicks off pilot plant testing

 
Cypress Development (CYP.V) has started the pilot plant which will be treating the lithium-bearing claystone from the Clayton Valley lithium project…

Cypress Development (CYP.V) has started the pilot plant which will be treating the lithium-bearing claystone from the Clayton Valley lithium project in Nevada, using a chloride-based leaching process. The results of this pilot plant test run will be extremely important for the Clayton Valley project as this will allow the company to complete its feasibility study using chloride leaching which could be very beneficial to the overall economics.

A lot of eyes are on Cypress Development right now as it’s one of the few advanced US-based lithium stories out there. With the lithium carbonate price now exceeding $20,000/t, the time seems to be right for Cypress to aggressively advance the project towards feasibility, permitting and financing. Using an LCE price of $14,250/t, the after-tax IRR was estimated at US$2.2B in the 2020 pre-feasibility study and with an anticipated production rate of in excess of 27,000 tonnes of lithium carbonate per year (as per the pre-feasibility study), Clayton Valley is sufficiently large to draw some attention. We will have a more detailed update out soon.


Disclosure: The author has a long position in Cypress Development. Cypress is a sponsor of the website. Please read our disclaimer.


Author: CR Team

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Articles

Who made the gains? Here are the top 50 resources winners for November

The top commodities in November were gold, copper and lithium. Copper, lithium, nickel and PGEs stocks increased their share of … Read More
The post…

‘Slow’vember certainly lived to its name, with only FIVE stocks making gains of 100% or more (the biggest movers being Tim Goyder-backed Devex Resources at 126% and  new copper miner AIC Mines (ASX:A1M) at 118%).

Compare that with October and September which had 14 and 19 stocks above 100%, respectively.

The biggest mover both months was Chinese rare earths stock Viagold, which is still suspended because it can’t explain some suspect trading action.

No Viagolds in November, just (mostly) quality stocks with good news to share.
 

What were our winners looking for?

The standout commodities in November were gold, copper and lithium.

Copper, lithium, nickel and platinum group elements (PGEs) increased their share of the top 50 month-on-month.


 

Here are the top 50 ASX resources stocks for the month of November >>>

Scroll or swipe to reveal table. Click headings to sort. Best viewed on a laptop

CODE COMPANY 1 MONTH RETURN % SHARE PRICE END NOV MARKET CAP COMMODITIES
DEV Devex Resources 126 0.7 $ 207,342,169.32 NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs, URANIUM
A1M AIC Mines 118 0.49 $ 152,813,933.91 COPPER, GOLD
HAW Hawthorn Resources 102 0.105 $ 31,683,983.24 IRON ORE, GOLD
ASQ Australian Silica 100 0.23 $ 50,918,805.28 SANDS, NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs
MRR Minrex Resources 100 0.04 $ 15,778,450.49 LITHIUM, GOLD, COPPER
AVZ AVZ Minerals 94 0.69 $ 1,995,267,061.60 LITHIUM, TIN
KWR Kingwest Resources 76 0.22 $ 55,570,420.75 GOLD
PGO Pacgold 76 0.545 $ 16,252,980.00 GOLD
KMT Kopore Metals 74 0.04 $ 24,524,778.20 COPPER, GOLD
TRL Tanga Resources 74 0.073 $ 32,362,250.76 GOLD
LCY Legacy Iron Ore 69 0.022 $ 153,713,724.41 IRON ORE, GOLD
CPN Caspin Resources 67 1.41 $ 83,435,748.45 NICKEL, COPPER, PGE
PSC Prospect Resources 64 0.69 $ 287,110,768.45 LITHIUM
TRT Todd River Resources 59 0.11 $ 59,261,788.22 NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs
MQR Marquee Resources 52 0.12 $ 21,366,813.26 LITHIUM, GOLD, COPPER
ATC Altech Chem 51 0.14 $ 180,441,939.58 HIGH PURITY ALUMINA
CDT Castle Minerals 50 0.027 $ 22,862,960.93 LITHIUM, GRAPHITE, GOLD, COPPER, LEAD, ZINC
PNR Pantoro 50 0.33 $ 465,134,570.34 GOLD, PGEs
CHN Chalice Mining 49 9.97 $ 3,347,550,801.00 NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs
LMG Latrobe Magnesium 49 0.094 $ 142,201,928.78 MAGNESIUM
EMT Emetals 47 0.022 $ 7,885,000.00 RARE EARTHS, GOLD, NICKEL, COPPER
LPD Lepidico 45 0.045 $ 261,258,367.69 LITHIUM
HIO Hawsons Iron 43 0.11 $ 68,645,083.20 IRON ORE
EFE Eastern Iron 41 0.076 $ 65,821,914.05 LITHIUM, IRON ORE
EGR Ecograf Limited 39 0.85 $ 373,776,770.97 GRAPHITE
STM Sunstone Metals 39 0.093 $ 214,744,413.98 COPPER, GOLD
JDR Jadar Resources 38 0.054 $ 39,298,937.66 LITHIUM, COPPER, TIN
RLC Reedy Lagoon 38 0.04 $ 21,601,046.64 LITHIUM, GOLD IRON ORE
E2M E2 Metals 36 0.32 $ 46,646,076.03 GOLD, SILVER
NIC Nickel Mines 36 1.42 $ 3,495,890,380.89 NICKEL
GW1 Greenwing Resources 34 0.45 $ 50,206,439.25 GRAPHITE, LITHIUM
M3M M3Mininglimited 34 0.295 $ 8,463,188.40 COPPER, GOLD
LOM Lucapa Diamond 33 0.084 $ 97,998,706.81 DIAMONDS
GLN Galan Lithium 33 1.68 $ 434,180,203.50 LITHIUM
MEP Minotaur Exploration 33 0.18 $ 87,734,350.90 KAOLIN, COPPER
MI6 Minerals260 33 0.62 $ 140,800,000.00 GOLD, NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs
SMI Santana Minerals 32 0.33 $ 39,791,186.40 GOLD
KRM Kingsrose Mining 29 0.08 $ 58,400,588.16 GOLD, SILVER, NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs
FNT Frontier Resources 29 0.0245 $ 16,675,045.72 RARE EARTHS, LITHIUM, GOLD
NXM Nexus Minerals 29 0.515 $ 145,417,789.60 GOLD, COPPER
SPQ Superior Resources 29 0.018 $ 24,609,234.26 GOLD, NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs,
WCN White Cliff Min 29 0.018 $ 8,275,142.38 RARE EARTHS, LITHIUM, GOLD
GL1 Globallith 28 0.62 $ 64,704,551.87 LITHIUM
DME Dome Gold Mines 28 0.23 $ 73,849,351.28 SANDS, COPPER, GOLD
STA Strandline Res 28 0.255 $ 257,691,885.46 SANDS
IR1 Irismetals 26 0.43 $ 17,531,249.58 NICKEL, GOLD
S2R S2 Resources 26 0.215 $ 74,838,719.55 GOLD, NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs
MGU Magnum Mining & Exp 26 0.087 $ 40,765,882.95 IRON ORE
ASM Ausstratmaterials 26 13.32 $ 1,738,244,834.76 RARE EARTHS, CRITICAL MINERALS
ASN Anson Resources 25 0.125 $ 132,781,906.40 LITHIUM
AVL Aust Vanadium 25 0.03 $ 91,879,454.97 VANADIUM, GOLD, NICKEL, COPPER, PGEs

 

‘The Chalice Effect’

The explosive impact of Chalice Mining’s (ASX:CHN) Gonneville discovery on surrounding explorers and other nickel-copper-PGE stocks is well documented.

Last month, CHN hit an all-time high after announcing a truly specular maiden resource of 10Moz Pd-Pt-Au, 530,000t nickel, 330,000t copper and 53,000t cobalt — the equivalent of 1.9Mt of nickel or 17Moz of palladium.

That’s the largest platinum group elements discovery ever in Australia, and the largest nickel sulphide discovery globally in 20 years.

Noted PGE expert Keith Goode told us Gonneville’s the best PGE discovery he’s ever seen.

 

It kicked off another run for surrounding high quality explorers like Devex Resources (ASX:DEV), Caspin Resources (ASX:CPN), Todd River Resources (ASX:TRT), and Minerals 260 (ASX:MI6).

DEV’s chairman is Tim Goyder, the same man who has stewarded Chalice and lithium explorer Liontown into positions as two of the ASX’s best performing stocks over the past year.

The visual indications from the first two stratigraphic holes at ‘Sovereign’ — a 50-50 JV with fellow November winner Australian Silica (ASX:ASQ) —  immediately to the north of Chalice’s Gonneville discovery are very promising.

“We are methodically ticking the boxes towards what we all hope will be a game-changing discovery at Sovereign,” DEV managing director Brendan Bradley says.

“The outcomes of these two widely-spaced stratigraphic holes have exceeded our expectations and given us confidence that we are very much on the right track with our exploration approach.


 

CPN was demerged from Cassini Resources, which was acquired by copper major OZ Minerals (ASX:OZL) in October last year for its ‘West Musgrave’ copper-nickel project.

What’s interesting about CPN is that it was one of the only explorers looking for nickel-copper-PGEs near Perth, WA, before Chalice moved next door and hit the motherlode in its very first hole.

That’s right — CPN is arguably the Julimar region OG.

Its main game is ‘Yarawinda Brook’, where drilling at the ‘XC-22’ anomaly last month intersected significant nickel and copper sulphides. Assays are pending.

 

TRT has one of the finest exploration teams in the business.

Managing director Will Dix was part of the team that discovered the ‘Waterloo’ nickel mine and the 2Moz ‘Thunderbox’ gold project, which is probably where he met non exec director Mark Bennett, best known for his leadership of small cap success story Sirius Resources.

Also on the board is Stu Crow, non-exec chairman at white hot lithium stock Lake Resources (ASX:LKE).

TRT has 5-6 projects, the most interesting right now being its ground near Julimar called ‘Berkshire Valley’ where 8,000m of drilling has now kicked off.

 

Liontown (ASX:LTR) spinout Minerals 260 has been a popular addition to the bourse.

Liontown had held the Moora gold-nickel-copper-PGE project near Julimar since 2018, with the asset now in the hands of MI6 and former Liontown CEO David Richards.

MI6 also holds an option to earn a 51% interest in the Koojan gold-nickel-copper-PGE project, the Dingo Rocks project and tenement applications at Yalwest.

A maiden gold drilling program at Moora kicked off early November.

 
 

The lithium wave strengthens

It had been another fantastic month for those veteran lithium stocks who did the hard yards when times were really bad.

Like, last year.

These near-term producers — like AVZ Minerals (ASX:AVZ), Prospect Resources (ASX:PSC), Lepidico (ASX:LPD), Galan Lithium (ASX:GLN) and Anson Resources (ASX:ASN) — have next dibs on this emerging and potentially very lucrative boom.

AVZ, PSC, LPD, GLN, ASN share price charts

 

But the November top 50 also contains a bunch of latecomers who are successfully riding this wave of supportive market sentiment.

Buying a couple of North American lithium and copper-gold projects  propelled Marquee Resources’ (ASX:MQR) share price to three-year highs.

The ‘Kibby Basin’ lithium project in Nevada is ~50km from Ioneer’s (ASX:INR) advanced Rhyolite Ridge lithium boron project, and 60km from MQR’s existing ‘Clayton Valley’ lithium project.

A drill campaign will begin in Q1 of 2022, MQR says.

Minrex Resources (ASX:MRR) is up ~100% since picking up a bunch of lithium projects in the Pilbara early last month.

This is all part of a strategy to become “an emergent lithium explorer with high-quality assets” within 70km of world-class lithium and tantalum producers Pilbara Minerals (ASX:PLS) and Mineral Resources (ASX:MRL), it says.

A further 97sqkm in exploration licence applications are currently subject to a ‘ballot’ (aka picking a name out of hat), including three tenements surrounding and adjoining Global Lithium’s (ASX:GLI) 10.1 million tonnes at the 1.1% Li ‘Archer’ project near Marble Bar.

MQR, MRR share price charts



The post Who made the gains? Here are the top 50 resources winners for November appeared first on Stockhead.












Author: Reuben Adams

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